Fall 2021 Seminars

Design of Affinity-based Biomaterials for Tissue Paper

Marian Hettiaratchi
Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact

University of Oregon

 

Monday, September 27
4-4:50 p.m.

LINC 314
Zoom ID:  
Passcode:  


ABSTRACT

Recombinant protein delivery is a promising approach to stimulate tissue regeneration following traumatic injury or disease. Yet, limited strategies are available to adequately localize sufficient quantities of bioactive, therapeutic proteins within injury sites to stimulate healing. Biomaterials that leverage electrostatic affinity interactions between proteins and materials can enable precise, tunable control over protein localization and release in vivo. My lab aims to engineer affinity interactions between therapeutic proteins and biomaterials to create delivery vehicles that can exert precise control over protein bioactivity and delivery. This seminar will demonstrate how novel approaches in protein engineering, computational bio-transport modeling, and directed evolution can be used to overcome the limitations of traditional biomaterial delivery vehicles and advance clinically relevant treatment strategies for musculoskeletal injuries.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Marian Hettiaratchi’s laboratory develops biomaterials for sustained protein delivery using an interdisciplinary approach that combines expertise in chemical engineering, polymer chemistry, and molecular biology. Dr. Hettiaratchi is an Assistant Professor of Bioengineering at the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact at the University of Oregon. She received her B.Sc. in chemical engineering from the University of Calgary and completed her Ph.D. at the joint biomedical engineering department of the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University. There she developed biomaterials to enhance bone regeneration. She then conducted post-doctoral research on engineering affinity-based biomaterials at the University of Toronto. Dr. Hettiaratchi has received doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Her lab’s work is funded by the Collins Medical Trust, Medical Research Foundation New Investigator Grant, and NIH R21 Trailblazer Award.

Engineering HP's 2030 Climate Goals

Bronwyn Pierce
Manager 3D & Graphics Product Stewardship

HP Sustainable Impact Operations & Compliance HP Inc.

Monday, October 4
4-4:50 p.m.

Linc 314
Zoom ID:  
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ABSTRACT

With the rapidly evolving impacts of Climate Change, Sustainability has become not just a market differentiator, but a business imperative and a customer expectation.  Learn how HP Sustainability Teams have helped define the 2030 Climate Goals for Carbon Neutral, Circularity, and Forest Positive. And gain key insights into what it takes to make a sustainable impact in a large organization.   

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Bronwyn is responsible for Product Stewardship across HP’s 3D, Large Format, and Industrial Graphics Printing Businesses.  She is also a management sponsor for HP’s Forest Positive Program.  Bronwyn and her teams are developing plans and implementation strategies for HP’s 2030 Sustainable Impact Goals.  And ensure customer safety and market access for current and new products. 

 

Bronwyn is a 25-year veteran of HP, with experience in EHS, Manufacturing, R&D, Operations, and Corporate Programs.  She has a strong background and record of leadership in the field of sustainability. In her previous role she served as Global Sustainability Program Manager for HP Real Estate.  In this role, Bronwyn was responsible for Water Conservation and Waste Reduction programs for over 600 HP sites around the world.  She also worked with Industry Partners and the US DOE to promote the availability of workplace electric vehicle charging.

 

While in Manufacturing, Bronwyn led up HP’s Voluntary Commitment with the US EPA to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from HP’s semiconductor fabs.  As an engineer in EHS, she led the effort to achieve HP’s first ISO 14001 manufacturing site certification and played a key role in additional site certifications. 

 

  

A Surface Level Perspective of Cellular Membrane Repair and Biomimetic Surfaces

Andrew Carpenter
NSF MPS-Ascend Postdoctoral Fellow and member of Professor Joe Baio's Research Group

Monday, October 11
4-4:50 p.m.

LINC 314
Zoom ID:  
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ABSTRACT

Proteins are life’s machinery ­– being involved in numerous cellular functions including the transcription and replication of genetic material, intracellular signaling, chemical catalysis, and more. Membrane bound proteins are a special class of proteins localized at cellular membranes, serving critical roles in maintaining cellular integrity and function. One such protein, dysferlin, is known to govern the membrane repair process when tears emerge within the muscle cell plasma membrane. Muscular dystrophy is known to occur in humans when dysferlin is found to be mutated or under-expressed, however, the specific interruption in the dysferlin mediated repair mechanism that leads to muscular dystrophy is unknown. Utilizing surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy, we are working towards elucidating the critical chemical interactions between dysferlin and biomimetic lipid surfaces in order to develop molecular-level insight into the mechanism underlying dysferlin mediated membrane repair. In this talk I will discuss our recent successes towards discerning the key chemical conditions that influence the initial step of the dysferlin mediated membrane repair process. Afterwards, I will highlight other work in progress in the Baio research group and how nonlinear spectroscopy is being used in conjunction with other surface analytical techniques to study an array of biomimetic and biological surfaces.  

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Andrew is currently a NSF MPS-Ascend Postdoctoral Fellow and member of Professor Joe Baio’s research group. In the Baio research group, he is applying surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods to develop a molecular level description of muscle cell membrane repair processes. Before coming to Oregon State University, Andrew received his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Oregon where his thesis research was carried out under the supervision of Professor Geraldine Richmond. For his thesis Andrew focused on building nonlinear surface specific spectroscopies to study the surface properties of nano-oil droplets. His work can be read in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and American Chemical Society journals.

 

A Surface Level Perspective of Cellular Membrane Repair and Biomimetic Surfaces

Zhenan Bao
Department Chair and K.K. Lee Professor of Chemical Engineering

Stanford University

Monday, October 18
4-4:50 p.m.

LINC 314
Zoom ID:  
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ABSTRACT

Skin is the body’s largest organ, and is responsible for the transduction of a vast amount of information. This conformable, stretchable, self-healable and biodegradable material simultaneously collects signals from external stimuli that translate into information such as pressure, pain, and temperature. The development of electronic materials, inspired by the complexity of this organ is a tremendous, unrealized materials challenge. However, the advent of organic-based electronic materials may offer a potential solution to this longstanding problem. Over the past decade, we have developed materials design concepts to add skin-like functions to organic electronic materials without compromising their electronic properties. These new materials and new devices enabled arrange of new applications in medical devices, robotics and wearable electronics. In this talk, I will discuss basic material design concepts for realizing stretchable, self-healable and biodegradable conductive or semiconductive materials. I will show our methods for scalable fabrication of stretchable electronic circuit blocks. Finally, I will show a few examples of applications we are pursuing uniquely enabled by skin-like organic electronics when interfacing with biological systems, such as low-voltage electrical stimulation, high-resolution large area electrophysiology, “morphing electronics” that grows with biological system and genetically targeted chemical assembly - GTCA.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Zhenan Bao is Department Chair and K.K. Lee Professor of Chemical Engineering, and by courtesy, a Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Material Science and Engineering at Stanford University. Bao founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiate (eWEAR) in 2016 and serves as the faculty director.

Prior to joining Stanford in 2004, she was a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies from 1995-2004. She received her Ph.D in Chemistry from the University of Chicago in 1995.  She has over 600 refereed publications and over 100 US patents with a Google Scholar H-Index >175.

Bao is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Inventors. She is a Fellow of MRS, ACS, AAAS, SPIE, ACS PMSE and ACS POLY. 

Bao was selected as Nature’s Ten people in 2015 as a “Master of Materials” for her work on artificial electronic skin. She was awarded the MRS Mid-Career Award in 2021, the inaugural ACS Central Science Disruptor and Innovator Prize in 2020, the Gibbs Medal by the Chicago session of ACS in 2020, the Wilhelm Exner Medal by Austrian Federal Minister of Science 2018, ACS Award on Applied Polymer Science 2017, the L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Award in the Physical Sciences 2017, the AICHE Andreas Acrivos Award for Professional Progress in Chemical Engineering in 2014, ACS Carl Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013, ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, the IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008.

Bao is a co-founder and on the Board of Directors for C3 Nano and PyrAmes, both are silicon-valley venture funded start-ups. She serves as an advising Partner for Fusion Venture Capital.

Spring 2021 Seminars

Nano Engineered Surfaces to Control Biological Response

Rahul Visalakshan
Post Doctoral Research Associate

Curtin University

Monday, March 29
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Medical devices are central to modern-day regenerative medicine, where they are used for enhancing, replacing, and restoring organs or bodily functions. However, the performance of biomedical devices is often compromised by microbial infections and unfavorable host immune responses such as foreign body reactions (FBR). Many nano-biomaterials have been explored in the last decade to control infection, inflammation, enhance tissue regeneration and wound healing to overcome these challenges. Nevertheless, the interaction between immune cells and the surfaces, which control FBR, remains poorly understood. It is crucial to gain a mechanistic understanding of protein: cell: biomaterial interface interactions. In my talk, I will discuss how proteins adsorb and unfold in response to the biomaterial surface properties, and the subsequent immunological responses. I will demonstrate various strategies to modify the surface of an implantable device with different surface coatings and nanostructures to overcome microbial infection and adverse immune responses. I will also outline our work on developing advanced nanoengineered plasma polymer coatings capable of directing stem cell differentiation, cell migration, and wound healing.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Rahul Madathiparambil Visalakshan holds a Ph.D. in Biomaterial Engineering and NanoMedicine (University of South Australia 2019). Subsequently, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate on an Innovative Manufacturing Cooperative Research Centre funded ($6M) project with Corin Group for the industrial translation of a bioinspired nanostructured antimicrobial surface for orthopedic implants. He is currently working as a postdoctoral research associate at Curtin University on 3D bioprinting of skin. His research is intensely multidisciplinary, at the interfaces of material science, nano-engineering, proteomics, cell biology, immunology, and microbiology. He has received the 2019 Norton Jackson Material Science and Engineering Medal for demonstrating the most realistic application of research in industry. He also won John A. Brodie Medal from Engineers Australia 2016, Australian Nanotechnology Network Fellowship 2018, and Best Oral Presentation awards at the International Conference on Molecular Biotechnology and Biomaterials, Netherlands, and the Australia-China Conference of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Australia.

Google Scholar:  https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=QRfIk74AAAAJ&hl=en

 Site Specific Insights in Catalysis by X-ray Based Spectroscopies Resolved at the Single Nanometer Regime

NNCI Research Associate Candidate

Friday, April 2
10-10:50 a.m.
Zoom ID: 921 3734 9985
Passcode: 172194


ABSTRACT

Rationally designing catalysts to enhance activity, selectivity, and durability requires fundamental insights into reaction mechanisms. In catalysis, adsorbate–surface interactions can yield nanocluster formation, subsurface species segregation, oxidations or reductions, and a host of other processes resulting from or even driving chemical activity. While a number of developments in the last two decades have enabled in-situ or operando probes of such processes, it remains a challenge to identify specific surface sites responsible for catalytic activity.

I will introduce three methods to solve this problem by resolving X-ray based spectroscopies near the single nanometer regime: (I) As an example of the ‘conventional’ approach I will demonstrate the role of oxygen vacancies in thin oxide films for room temperature CO oxidation using near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (NAP-STM) and near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS). (II) Next, using simultaneous NAP-XPS and grazing incidence X-ray scattering, I will discuss the in-situ evolution of structure and chemistry in organic systems, and in Au/TiO2. (III) Finally, I will show the direct measurement of the elemental/chemical identity of surface species by measuring X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the apex of an STM tip. These methods enable nearly site-specific correlation of structure and chemistry under reaction conditions, and enable a detailed view of the processes underlying catalytic activity.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Heath Kersell is a postdoc at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where he applies surface science methods at reaction conditions to understand the interplay between chemistry, structure, and activity in catalysis. Seeking to enable a ‘roadmap’ toward more energy efficient, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective processes, he has established experimental techniques enabling the correlation of chemistry and nanoscale structure. These efforts have led to a detailed understanding of catalyst systems, and present new opportunities to measure in-situ or operando processes in a variety of technologically important systems.

Using APXPS to Probe the Solid/Gas and Solid/Liquid Interface Under In Situ and Operando Conditions

Ethan Crumlin
Career Staff Scientist

Advanced Light Source

Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory

 

Monday, April 5
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Interfaces play an essential role in nearly all aspects of life and are critical for electrochemistry.  Electrochemical systems ranging from high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to batteries to capacitors have a wide range of important interfaces between solids, liquids, and gases which play a pivotal role in how energy is stored, transferred, and/or converted.  This talk will focus on our use of ambient pressure XPS (APXPS) to directly probe the solid/gas and solid/liquid electrochemical interface. APXPS is a photon-in/electron-out process that can provide both atomic concentration and chemical-specific information at pressures greater than 20 Torr. Using synchrotron X-rays at Lawrence Berkeley Nation Laboratory, the Advanced Light Source has several beamlines dedicated to APXPS endstations that are outfitted with various in situ/operando features such as heating to temperatures > 500 °C, pressures greater than 20 Torr to support solid/liquid experiments and electrical leads to support applying electrical potentials support the ability to collect XPS data of actual electrochemical devices while it's operating in near ambient pressures. This talk will introduce APXPS and provide several solid/gas and solid/liquid interface electrochemistry examples using in situ and operando APXPS including the probing of a Pt metal electrode undergoing a water-splitting reaction to generate oxygen, utilization of theory and experiment to understand CO2’s interaction with Cu and Ag metal surfaces, and the ability to probe the electrochemical double layer (EDL). Gaining new insight to guide the design and control of future electrochemical interfaces.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Ethan J. Crumlin is a Career Staff Scientist at the Advanced Light Source (ALS, a 3rd generation synchrotron facility) and in the Chemical Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley California. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2012). Afterward, he joined ALS as a postdoctoral fellow and subsequently progressed to becoming a Research Scientist (2014) and then a Career Staff Scientist (2017). In 2021, he became a Courtesy Faculty member at Oregon State University in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering (CBEE). As a scientist at ALS, Dr. Crumlin helps researchers from all around the world to conduct leading X-ray-based experiments to answer challenging scientific questions. His research group focuses on the utilization and development of ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to study chemical and electrochemical reactions at the solid/gas, solid/liquid, and solid/solid interfaces for catalysts, batteries, corrosion, and electrochemical CO2 reduction and water splitting electrocatalysis all under in situ and operando conditions. He has been recognized for his scientific achievements receiving the International Solid State Ionics Young Scientist Award, The American Ceramics Society Ross Coffin Purdy Award, the Department of Energy Early Career Research Award, the LBNL Director’s Award for Exceptional Early Scientific Career Achievement, and the International Society of Electrochemistry-Elsevier Prize for Experimental Electrochemistry.

 

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the Electrocatalyst for Water Splitting

Maoyu Wang
Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering

Oregon State University

Monday, April 12
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID:  987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

The high-efficiency and low-cost catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are critical for electrochemical water splitting to generate hydrogen as the clean fuel for sustainable energy conversion and storage. The development of those catalysts relies on discovering their active sites and understanding of their catalytical states so that rational design strategies can be applied. Transition metal sulfides are an emerging type of OER catalyst that exhibits superior activity even better than commercial standards such as IrO2. However, they undergo structural and compositional change during the reaction, which adds difficulties in studying catalytic active sites. Here, we use cobalt sulfide, Co9S8, as a representative example. Utilizing multimodal operando characterizations including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity, we find that Co9S8 ultimately converts to oxide cluster (CoOx) containing six oxygen coordinated Co as the basic unit which is the true catalytic center to promote high OER activity. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations verify the in-situ generated CoOx consisting of di-µ-oxo Co-Co motifs in CoO6 octahedral clusters as the actual active sites. Our results also provide insights to design other transition metal X-ides (X: C, P, N, S, etc.) as efficient electrocatalysts that experience a similar restructuring in OER.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Maoyu Wang received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Oregon State University in 2016. Currently, he is a Ph.D. candidate in the group of Prof. Zhenxing Feng at Oregon State University. He focuses on using spectroscopy to study electrocatalytic reactions. Also, he works on designing the new electrocatalyst for water splitting and fuel cells. He has extensive experience in synchrotron radiation experiments and has already published about 38 scientific journal articles during his Ph.D. study. He has been awarded the OSU College of Engineering Graduate Research Assistant Award and OSU International Student Scholarship.

Synergistic Study of Thermal Decomposition of Acetic Acid on Pd(111) using Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and Density Functional Theory (DFT)

Hoan Nguyen
Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering

Oregon State University

ABSTRACT

Acetic acid’s thermal decomposition over Pd (111) is a good model to study the stability of fatty acids and other oxygenates involved in biofuel production. The molecular modeling of this surface reaction would give insights into how to tune the selectivity of the reactions involved. Previous density functional theory (DFT) studies on the thermal decomposition of acetic acid on Pd (111) suggest that carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2), are produced by two different reaction pathways: decarbonylation (DCN), and decarboxylation (DCX), respectively. To further understand these reaction mechanisms, we have studied this model system using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and mass spectrometry (MS). The experimental data analysis is supported by DFT calculations of the XPS spectra as well as calculations of the reactions mechanism and microkinetic modeling. Exposures under 1mbar of acetic acid on Pd (111) single crystal at room temperature shows the presence of various species: surface carbon, chemisorbed acetic acid, acetate, and CO, and gaseous acid. We also explored the effect of co-adsorbed water on the selectivity of the pathways by dosing acetic acid in the presence of water. The addition of waters shows an increase in the coverage of acetic acid and a decrease in CO coverage. Moreover, gaseous components from the reaction show an increase in CO2/CO ratio from 2.2 to 2.8 suggesting an enhancement of DCX over DCN when adsorbed water is present. This is further supported by our microkinetic model which shows that in the presence of water the DCX is favored over DCN.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Hoan Nguyen is a Ph.D. candidate in Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University, working with Dr. Líney Árnadóttir. He received his BSc in Chemistry at Pacific University in 2019 and started pursuing his Ph.D. at OSU afterwards. His current research efforts involved studying stability of oxygenates on noble metal surface using a combined experimental and theoretical approach.

Applications of Electrospun Nanofibers and Functionalized Nanofiber Composites in Environmental Treatment and Monitoring

David Cwiertny
Professor

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

University of Iowa

 

Monday, April 19
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Electrospinning is a highly versatile and scalable fabrication technique for functionalized nanofibers and nanofiber composites. For over a decade, we have used this approach to develop nanofiber networks for a range of environmental applications. This talk will highlight specific examples from our work including the fabrication of functionalized polymer-nanoparticle composite fibers for treatment applications including ion exchange, sorption, disinfection and photoxidation. More recently, our efforts have aimed to integrate spectrosopic methods for sensing and demonstrated the use of nanofiber mats as equilibrium passive sampling materials for surface water and air quality monitoring.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. David Cwiertny is the William D. Ashton Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the University of Iowa (UI). His research specializes in the development of nanomaterials-based approaches for resource sustainability, and studying the environmental fate and transformation of emerging pollutant classes. At UI, he directs the State-funded Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination (CHEEC), which conducts research to identify, measure, and prevent adverse health outcomes from exposure to environmental toxins. He also serves as the director of the Environmental Policy Research Program through the University of Iowa Public Policy Center (PPC). In 2016, he served as a Congressional Fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), working in the U.S. House of Representatives on the Committee for Energy and Commerce. He previously served as the founding Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology. David holds a BS in Environmental Engineering Science and a minor in Chemistry from U.C. Berkeley (2000), and a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University (2006).

Metal Oxide Nanoparticles and the Environment: from Applications to Implications

Natalia Gonzalez-Pech
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Hope College

 

Monday, April 26
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Although nanotechnology has opened a wide range of possibilities in different applications, multiple implementation barriers have yet to be overcome to solve real problems including the lack of cost-effective and scalable synthetic methodologies, the difficulty of implementing nanomaterials in filter set-ups without losing their functionality, and the reuse/regeneration of highly concentrated hazard materials. During my doctoral dissertation, several implementation barriers while developing iron oxide nanomaterials for arsenic remediation were confronted. The use of clusters of nanoparticles was proposed to benefit the properties of both the nanoparticles and the bulk material. The kitchen synthesis of nanomagnetite previously introduced by the Colvin group was modified. The proposed modification reduced the multiple steps process to a one-pot synthesis. The obtained nanoparticles have much better arsenic removal performance than the nanoparticles prepared by other synthetic methods.
My postdoctoral work focused on characterizing nanoparticles generated in the occupational settings and their negative health effects. The evaluation of the concentration, composition and size of incidental nanoparticles in several industrial workplaces using on-site and off-site techniques was achieved. Two occupational settings, a heavy vehicle machining and assembly center and an iron foundry, were selected to a more detailed analysis due to expected concentrations of Fe, Mn and Cu nanoparticles. My findings revealed a particle aggregation behavior that shall be considered when analyzing respirable fraction of incidental particles for toxicology implications.

Currently at Hope College, my group focuses on the development of nanomaterials for water remediation and energy-related applications in a sustainable manner. While solving environmental problems, our students learn about environmental chemistry, material science and surface chemistry.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Natalia Gonzalez-Pech is originally from Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico. She received her B.S. in Chemistry from Monterrey Tech (ITESM). In 2016, Natalia completed her Ph.D. in Chemistry, in Rice University. Her doctoral research focused on nanomaterials synthesis and characterization, and their applications in water processes. Dr. Gonzalez-Pech did her postdoctoral research at UCSD. Her research focused in the characterizing metal-containing nanoparticles formed in industrial processes and the understanding of their health effects. Currently, her research group focuses on the development of nanomaterials for water remediation and energy-related applications in a sustainable manner.

 

 

Leveraging Natural Silk Biopolymers for Applications in Regenerative Medicine

Whitney Stoppel
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

University of Florida

 

Monday, May 3
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Unique mechanical and structural properties arise from silk fibroin-based materials when these proteins are rendered water-insoluble through a process that results in the collapse of the linearized protein into beta sheet structures resulting in nanocrystalline domains within the tertiary structure. We are leveraging these mechanical and structural properties to create useful silk biomaterial-based culture platforms for investigating mechanisms of disease as well as developing implantable biomaterials for applications in rehabilitative engineering. However, in the biomaterials community, it is often difficult to quantify the term “useful.” Thus, recent work has focused on improving predictive material design through kinetic modeling of silk biomaterial degradation in vitro as a fucntion of nanocrystaline domains and addition of secondary components, such as extracellular matrix, to the silk biomaterial formulation. This work, coupled with the investigation of growth factor delivery and in vivo cell infiltration, sheds light on the influence of silk fibroin protein structure on in vitro and in vivo material performance based on intial material formulations. Our results aid in the reduction of biomaterial formulation optimiation using a “guess and check” strategy. On-going work by Stoppel Lab PhD student Julie Jameson, in collaboration with a PhD student in the Zare Lab in UF ECE, Joshua Peeples, takes this a step further using machine learning to evaluate key parameters of biomaterial performance following implantation, such as degradation rate and adipose tissue accumulation, as we aim to build tools and methods to quantitatively assess biomaterial performance in vivo.  

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Whitney Stoppel is an assistant professor in the department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida. She received her B.S. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from Tulane University, a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering and a graduate certificate in Cellular Engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and completed an NIH IRACDA postdoctoral fellowship in Biomedical Engineering at Tufts University. Her current research centers on the development of all natural biomaterial platforms for investigating skeletal muscle disease and repair, delivering bioactive molecules to sites of injury or disease in vivo, and for the delivery of genetic materials into silk worms for engineering silk fibroin protein production. The Stoppel lab exploits the highly tunable mechanical and structural properites of silk fibroin proteins to address pressing clinical problems and lead to fundamental investigation of disease mechanisms in vitro. Dr. Stoppel is the recent recipient of a Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research fund Discovery Award. At UF, Dr. Stoppel enjoys teaching Elementary Transport for undergraduate chemical engineers, serving as a chair of the Graduate Recruiting Committee and a member of the ChE DEI committee, as well as mentoring over 15 UF undergraduates in the laboratory since starting her lab in Fall 2018.

Water Technologies by Interface Engineering

Seth Darling
Director of the Center for Molecular Engineering & Senior Scientist

Argonne National Lab

 

Monday, May 10
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Driven by climate change, population growth, development, urbanization, and other factors, water crises represent one of the greatest global risks in the coming decades.  Advances in materials represent a powerful tool to address many of these challenges.  Understanding—and ultimately controlling—interfaces between materials and water are pivotal.  In this presentation, Dr. Darling will lay out the challenges and present several examples of work in his group based on materials engineering strategies for addressing applications in water.  In each instance, manipulation of interfacial properties provides novel functionality, ranging from selective transport to energy transduction to pollution mitigation.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Seth B. Darling is the Director of the Center for Molecular Engineering and a Senior Scientist in the Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He also serves as the Director of the Advanced Materials for Energy-Water Systems (AMEWS) Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC). He received his PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Chicago. His group’s research centers around molecular engineering with a current emphasis on advanced materials for cleaning water, having made previous contributions in fields ranging from self-assembly to advanced lithography to solar energy. He has published over 140 scientific articles, holds over a dozen patents, is a co-author of popular books on water and on debunking climate skeptic myths, and lectures widely on topics related to energy, water, and climate.

 

 

Publishing Advanced Materials Science with Wiley - How to Maximize Your Success!

Jos Lenders
Editor-in-Chief 

"Advanced Materials" from Wiley

 

Monday, May 17
9-9:50 a.m.
Zoom ID: 935 0301 8445
Passcode: 784511


ABSTRACT

Materials science is a multidisciplinary field of research with many different scientists and engineers having various backgrounds active in it. The literature landscape consequently is populated currently by a wide range of journals which greatly differ in purpose, scope, quality, and readership.

Jos Lenders (Editor-in-Chief of Advanced Materials) will track some of the most important developments and trends in the research field and the Advanced journals program. Advanced Materials reached an Impact Factor of 27.398 and received over 8,500 submissions last year – and Advanced Functional Materials over 11,000. Only around 15% of all those papers made it to publication in these journals, and this rate is similar for all other Advanced journals. So, what do editors do to select the very best papers, and what can authors do to optimize their chances of having their manuscripts accepted?

Jos hopes to provide some insights into these topics. Key aspects are: structuring one’s research work well and assembling a convincing manuscript, understanding the decision processes in editorial offices, choosing an appropriate journal and knowing what to put in the cover letter, and which things to avoid. The talk will also cover the reasoning behind editorial workflows and the peer-review process, publishing ethics and best practices for authors and reviewers, and possibilities for open access. Anybody who is enthused about where the field of materials science and its top-level publications will go next is more than welcome to join the seminar and discussion.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Jos Lenders is the Editor-in-Chief of Advanced Materials as well as a Deputy Editor for Advanced Optical Materials. He studied chemical engineering with a minor in biomedical engineering and a master in polymers and composites at Eindhoven University of Technology (in the Netherlands), where he also obtained his PhD in the area of bioinspired materials chemistry and advanced electron microscopy. He joined Wiley in 2015.

Explicit Physics-Informed Neural Networks for Nonlinear Closure: The Case of Transport in Tissues

Brian Wood
Professor of Environmental Engineering

Oregon State University

 

Monday, May 24
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

In this work, we use a combination of formal upscaling and data-driven machine learning for explicitly closing a nonlinear transport and reaction process in a multiscale tissue.  The classical effectiveness factor model is used to formulate the macroscale reaction kinetics. We train a multilayer perceptron network using training data generated by direct numerical simulations over thousands of microscale examples. Once trained, the network is applied in an algorithm for numerically solving the upscaled (coarse-grained) differential equation describing mass transport and reaction in two example tissues.  The network is described as being explicit in the sense that the network is trained using macroscale concentrations and gradients of concentration as components of the feature space.

Network training and solutions to the macroscale transport equations were computed for two different tissues.  The two tissue types (brain and liver) exhibit markedly different geometry and spatial scale (cell size and sample size).  The upscaled solutions for the average concentration are compared with numerical solutions derived from the microscale concentration fields by a posteriori averaging.

There are two outcomes of this work of particular note: 1) we find that that the trained network exhibits good generalizability, and it is able to predict the effectiveness factor with high fidelity for realistically-structured tissues despite the significantly different scale and geometry of the two example tissue types; and 2) the approach results in an upscaled PDE with an effectiveness factor that is predicted (implicitly) via the trained neural network. This latter result emphasizes our purposeful connection between conventional averaging methods with the use of machine learning for closure; this contrasts with some machine learning methods for upscaling where the exact form of the macroscale equation remains unknown.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Professor Brian Wood is an engineer with research interests and expertise in the areas of transport of mass, momentum, and energy in natural and engineered multiscale systems.  Current interests include the study of turbulence in porous media, and the multiscale analysis of biological tissues, with particular applications to the modeling of cancer biology.  Recent efforts have focused on using machine learning techniques in engineering problems.  His research has been funded primarily by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE).  Dr. Wood received his bachelor of science and master of science in from Washington State University. He received his doctorate from the University of California at Davis.

 

Winter 2021 Seminars

Computationally Analyzing Graphs and Using Machine-learning for Drug Repositioning and Precision Oncology Applications 

Stephen Ramsey
Associate Professor

Oregon State University

Monday, January 4
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

I will describe our work on two projects: an NIH consortium project, the Biomedical Data Translator, and a project to use machine learning to improve outcomes in cancer treatment. The Biomedical Data Translator project's broad aim is to advance translational science using computer-aided knowledge exploration and reasoning. Our team is developing a reasoning system, ARAX, that is geared toward drug repositioning for common diseases and therapeutic recommendation for rare inherited diseases. I will describe some of the principles behind this system and key challenges inherent to building scalable reasoning systems. For the precision oncology project, I will also present some recent work in our lab on using machine-learning to predict response to chemotherapy based on transcriptome data acquired from tumor samples. 

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Stephen originally trained in physics and mathematics, earning an ScB from Brown University and a PhD from the University of Maryland. Building on his computational modeling experience, Stephen trained as a postdoc at the University of Washington Genome Center, where he worked on the Human Genome Project in Maynard Olson's laboratory. Stephen's work on genome mapping algorithms paved the way toward molecular-oriented research projects in the labs of Hamid Bolouri and Ilya Shmulevich at the Institute for Systems Biology. As a senior scientist in Alan Aderem's laboratory at the Center for Infectious Disease Research, Stephen worked on computational methods for mapping gene regulatory networks. At OSU, Stephen holds a dual appointment in the Department of Biomedical Sciences and in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Stephen's research has been recognized by multiple awards including an NIH K25 Career Development Award, a PhRMA New Investigator Award, an NSF CAREER award, and the Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine Zoetis Award.

              • Associate Professor, OSU Department of Biomedical Sciences

              • Associate Professor, OSU School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

              • Affiliate Member, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute

              • Faculty Affiliate, OSU Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing

 

 

The Mechanics Behind the Miracle of Life: Maternal Soft Tissue Growth and Remodeling 

BioE Candidate A

Monday, January 11
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

This seminar will outline my Ph.D. work, which focused on experimental and computational pregnancy biomechanics, and my motivations to focus on heart growth mechanics for my postdoctoral research. Finally, I will outline how I will combine the skills I learned during my Ph.D. and postdoc to pursue my independent work, where I seek to answer the question: How does the uterus grow and stretch by 1000-fold but not contract until labor?

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

 

 

 

Cell-instructive Materials for 3D Bioprinting: From Stem Cells to Functional Musculoskeletal Tissues 

BioE Candidate B

Thursday, January 14
1-1:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 915 6989 5609
Passcode: 567500


ABSTRACT

The clinical translation of cell-based tissue engineering strategies for musculoskeletal regeneration faces many challenges. These include maintenance of cell survival in the harsh in vivo environment, the lack of control over regulating cell phenotype upon implantation, tissue vascularization, and the engineering of complex tissue interfaces. To address these challenges, the development of cell-instructive materials featuring bioactive cues to modulate the behavior of host and implanted cells has taken center stage. However, traditional tissue engineering approaches, aiming to present these signals in homogenous scaffolds, are limited in their potential to recapitulate the complexity of native tissues. This has motivated increased interest in the use of three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting to deposit cell and bioactive molecules in a spatially defined manner to engineer implants capable of regenerating complex musculoskeletal tissues. My research focuses on the development of innovative materials featuring soluble and insoluble cues to dictate cell function and their combination with biofabrication strategies for the engineering of clinically relevant musculoskeletal tissue grafts. With this in mind, this talk will be centered on my scientific pursuits toward (1) how to present these soluble (proteins and genes) and insoluble (extracellular matrix (ECM) components) signals to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to guide their phenotype in vivo and (2) how to incorporate these signals into 3D printable biomaterials to build anatomically accurate human parts. Lastly, I will present my research vision focused on the on the tailoring of bioink biochemical and physical properties to achieve specific responses from encapsulated cells, and the modulation of the interplay between the 3D printed implant, its surrounding tissue and the systemic biological and pathological processes that mediate in effective tissue repair.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Micro-construction - Building Homes of the Future for the Modern Cell 

BioE Candidate C

Thursday, January 21
1-1:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 999 3650 1824
Passcode: 221006


ABSTRACT

Efforts to close the gap between in vitro to in vivo model systems have produced technologies that more effectively evaluate spatial, structural, and mechanical control mechanisms. However, existing in vitro models lack temporal regulation that captures the controlled, rhythmic processes that often occur in biological phenomena. A major contributor to this tech-bio mismatch is the difficulty to easily and sustainably scale our ability to apply timed oscillations, representative of biorhythms, in vitro. Developing technologies that are simpler and more adoptable for users, while ensuring higher throughput, have the potential to shift the way in which we establish cell cultures with a dynamic biorhythmic baseline.


In this talk, I will cover how my previous work in different technology platforms will be leveraged to establish next generation cell and tissue culture platforms that enable biomolecule timed oscillations in more complex microenvironments. First, I will discuss the development of microfluidic self-regulating circuits as a tool to produce modular chemical profiles on-chip at different timescales. Second, I will describe microparticle building blocks for the generation of customizable porous scaffolds that are porous, and consequently perfusable, enabling our ability to apply biomolecule timed oscillations through liquid flow to 3D scaffolds. Finally, I will describe my proposed research on establishing biorhythms in vitro and how these model systems will enable my research group to begin studying how stress within our lives lead to specific disease priming mechanisms.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Exploring How Sleep Relates to Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

BioE Candidate D

Monday, January 25
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients often have debilitating, unpredictable pain which can be negatively reinforced by additional symptoms like disrupted sleep and autonomic disfunction. While these relationships are poorly understood, animal models provide a powerful platform to quantify these changes beyond what is possible in humans. However, they have their own challenges: traditional assessments are often stressful or invasive which may compromise findings, and quantifying pain experience in animals taxonomically distant and unable to verbally communicate is difficult. As such, there is a need to develop continuous, noninvasive observation tools to quantify sources and predictors of pain in animal models. Discussed in this seminar, technological advances in noninvasive animal observation techniques using electric field sensors offer new insight relating sleep fragmentation, autonomic disfunction, and chronic pain after SCI. This work can enhance our understanding of physio-behavioral consequences of many disease models and initiate a paradigm shift in animal research.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Advances in Engineering Particles for Immunotherapy of Autoimmune Disease

Jamal Lewis
Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

University of California, Davis

Monday, February 1
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Current paradigms for the treatment of autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) are woefully inadequate, often missing the mark on desired physiological responses and not targeting the root cause of the disease. Predictably, novel approaches to re-establish immune homeostasis in patients afflicted by autoimmune conditions are now under intense investigation. Notably, we are developing an array of multifunctional, biomaterial-based ‘regulatory vaccines’ that can be easily administered to remediate some of the prevalent autoimmune diseases. In this talk, I will focus on two particulate systems currently under development in my lab, which attempt to control critical cellular and humoral mediators that engender conditions such as RA and autoimmune autism. Additionally, the Lewis lab is currently investigating the interaction of innate immune cells and degradable polymers (e.g. PLGA). More specifically, we are interested in deciphering the mechanisms that govern the effects of these materials on innate immune cells.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Jamal Lewis is an Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Davis. Prior to his professorship, Dr. Lewis was Senior Scientist at OneVax, LLC and a Post Doctoral Associate in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, where he also received a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering in 2012. Dr. Lewis completed his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Florida A&M University in 2004, and M.S. in Biomedical Engineering in 2007 from North Carolina State University. His research, educational and entrepreneurial efforts have been supported by the NIH. His honors and awards include the prestigious NIH Early Stage Investigator MIRA, Regenerative Medicine Workshop Young Faculty Award, Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Young Innovators, and the Shu Chien Early Career Lecturer Award.

Three relevant publications to this talk:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12195-020-00652-x

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1549963419301510?via%3Dihub

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsabm.9b00092

Linking Adsorption to Kinetics for Aqueous-phase Catalytic Fuel Production and Wastewater Remediation

Nirala Singh
Assistant Professor

University of Michigan

Monday, February 8
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

The need for sustainable and environmentally friendly production of chemicals is leading to a change in the types of feedstocks that are available to engineers. This desire to use a wider variety of chemical feedstocks, e.g., condensed phase streams, and the decreasing cost of renewable electricity has given rise to opportunities in the science of condensed phase heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. In this talk I will discuss two aqueous-phase reactions relevant to the production of fuels and wastewater remediation: phenol hydrogenation (as a model of bio-oil upgrading) and nitrate reduction (for conversion of nitrate to ammonia). Both of these reactions on platinum group metals are rate-controlled by a surface reaction step, and as such the adsorption energetics of the reacting species play a significant role in controlling the reaction rate as expected from the well-known Langmuir-Hinshelwood model and through the Sabatier principle of catalysis. I will show how employing traditional heterogeneous catalytic methods developed for gas-phase reactions and an important part of chemical engineering curriculum have led to a better understanding of these aqueous-phase reactions. I will specifically focus on the link between aqueous-phase adsorption energies and kinetic trends. I will go over the importance of solvent displacement in aqueous-phase adsorption and show how a simple bond-additivity model can accurately account for these effects for organic molecules such as phenol. I will also discuss tools to study these reactions under operating conditions to build a more complete story of the role of coverage on reaction kinetics. Lastly, we will discuss how we have used the link between adsorption and activity to design new catalysts or control reaction conditions to increase rates for these important reactions. In the end I will show show how traditional catalytic methods and gas-phase intuition can strongly benefit the understanding of condensed phase catalysis and electrocatalysis.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Nirala Singh is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He joined the faculty at Michigan in 2018 after completing a Washington Research Foundation Innovation Fellowship at the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with Charlie Campbell and Johannes Lercher. He received his BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan and received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2015 working with Eric McFarland and Horia Metiu. Singh’s lab uses experimental kinetics, adsorption models, and spectroscopy to understand electrocatalytic reactions for energy storage, sustainable chemical and fuel production, and wastewater remediation.

Website: https://cheresearch.engin.umich.edu/singh/index.htm

Atomic Layer Deposition: A Scalable Process Enabling the Next Generation of Advanced Materials for Commercial Applications

Staci Moulton
Application Engineer for Business Development

Forge Nano, Thornton, CO

Monday, February 15
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a platform technology for powders, porous particles, and high-surface area objects that has been widely demonstrated throughout the literature to impart significant processing and performance gains in all areas of advanced materials. It is a well-known (elegant) method for upgrading anything from battery powders to barrier coatings but has historically been regarded as a lab-only process. Forge Nano invented a high-throughput method and has scaled-it over the past decade making it affordable as a material-upgrading technique. Historically, ALD has been too expensive to consider as a realistic process for commercial adoption. Forge Nano has patented, constructed, and demonstrated the highest throughput ALD capability in the world, unlocking new potential for lower cost integration of ALD into products.

 

In this seminar, Forge Nano will discuss ALD as a means of controlling surface phenomena and applications in a spectrum of technologies ranging from pigments to catalysis. Examples of successful applications in energy storage and water cleanup will be covered. And Forge Nano will discuss ALD methodologies and best-suited applications to clarify the most appropriate steps towards the industrialization of ALD-enabled materials for various application examples. The intent of this seminar is to ensure that scientists and engineers are aware of ALD as a cross-functional platform technology to further their own research and maintain cutting-edge technological development, as many are unaware that it is now a commercial technology.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Staci serves as Application Engineer for Business Development at Forge Nano in Thornton, CO. She is a key liaison with customers and project partners for delivery of technical content, limitations of ALD, and market readiness of applications including cost analysis. She received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Oregon State University, Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of Colorado – Boulder studying ALD of cobalt for active catalyst materials, and MBA from University of Colorado – Denver. She was the PI for an Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPAe) project for ALD catalysis and its commercial opportunities, has authored ALD and polymer patents, and was a technology lead for a research firm proposing research projects to U.S. government agencies for commercialization.          

Nanomaterials: The Known Unknowns

Eugenia (Eva) Valsami-Jones
University of Birmingham, England

Monday, February 22
9-9:50 a.m.
Zoom ID: 934 4777 1468

Passcode: 292356

ABSTRACT

Nanotechnology is often described as an enabling technology with the potential to revolutionise modern life.  A key product of the nanotech revolution, nanomaterials, are already used commercially for a multitude of applications, in cosmetics, textiles, healthcare products, energy production, environmental technologies, to name but a few. 

But how well do we know nanomaterials and are there still key characteristics of their behaviour we know very little about? And, if so, why does it matter? An increasing body of scientific evidence suggests that some materials in their nano-form have properties that diverge significantly from their bulk analogues. Specifically, a key feature of nanomaterials is that they are highly reactive, transforming chemically, agglomerating, and/or acquiring an evolving coating of environmental or biological macromolecules, which provides them with a new identity, distinct from that of their pristine form. Linked to this, another key feature is the difficulty in nanomaterial characterisation, particularly in complex (environmental or biological) media.

In my lecture, I will be presenting data on advances we have made to date in studying nanomaterial behaviour, focussing particularly on their mobility and solubility, as well as needs for further work to understand these known unknowns sufficiently to enable better innovation but also regulation and citizen/consumer confidence.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Eugenia (Éva) Valsami-Jones is a Professor of Environmental Nanoscience at the University of Birmingham, where she is also Director of the Facility for Environmental Nanoscience Analysis and Characterisation (FENAC, www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/fenac) and Director of the MRes programme on Environmental and Biological Nanoscience. She has coordinated FP7 projects NanoReTox, ModNanoTox and NanoMILE and is currently coordinating H2020 project ACEnano (http://acenano-project.eu). She is also leading the EC’s NanoSafety Cluster (www.nanosafetycluster.eu).

Professor Valsami-Jones’ research focuses around the mechanisms involved in nanoscale processes in a biological and environmental context. She has studied the reactivity and potential toxicity, fate and transformations of nanomaterials in the environment. She has pioneered the development of traceable stable-isotope labelled nanomaterials and is currently working on the development of analytical solutions for the improvement in speed and quality of identification of nanoscale objects in complex matrices.

Professor Valsami-Jones was the Mineralogical Society’s Distinguished Lecturer for 2015 and the Distinguished Guest Lecturer and Medalist of the Royal Society of Chemistry for 2015. She is currently a Royal Society Wolfson Fellow.

Gravitational Wave Astronomy: History in the Making

Jeff Kissel
Controls Engineer

LIGO Hanford Observatory

Monday, March 1
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Having just past the five-year anniversary of the first direct detection of gravitational waves this past September, the international network of gravitational wave (GW) detectors -- including the two U.S.-based detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (or LIGO) -- has been quite busy. The number of detections has surpassed 70, and we’ve learned so many new things from the diversity of individual events that one can no longer squeeze even the highlights into one talk! Instead, I’ll cover the what we’re now beginning to discern about fundamental physics from the population of detections we’ve observed, cover the promise of the imminent data release, and cover some of the upgrades we’ll be installing over the next few years such that we may hopefully achieve the full capability of these “A+” generation LIGO detectors, able to observe several GW detections per week of operation.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Jeff Kissel [he/him/his] is the Controls Engineer for the LIGO Hanford Observatory. He graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a BS in Astronomy and Astrophysics in 2005, went on earn his doctorate in Physics from Louisiana State University in 2010, with a thesis focusing on Calibration and Seismic Isolation Control Systems for the “initial" and “enhanced” generations of LIGO detectors, respectively. After a three year stint at MIT as a post-doctoral researcher leading the design, testing, and commissioning of the Suspension Control Systems during construction of the “advanced” generation of LIGO, he arrived in Eastern Washington as a staff scientist in 2013. His control system specialties have since ballooned to touch all aspects of the myriad of control systems LIGO needs to achieve its ground-breaking sensitivity.

Integrating Materials and Electrochemical Processes for Selective Nitrogen Recovery from Wastewater

William Tarpeh
Assistant Professor

Stanford University

Monday, March 8
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 987 6966 9284 
Passcode: 265843


ABSTRACT

Over the past century, humans have altered the global nitrogen cycle so drastically that managing nitrogen has emerged as a grand engineering challenge. The Haber-Bosch process for industrial fertilizer production, which converts nitrogen gas into ammonia, outpaces wastewater nitrogen removal due to fertilizer runoff and 80% of wastewater being discharged without treatment. This net discharge of reactive nitrogen (e.g., NH4+, NO3-) threatens aquatic ecosystems and human health by inducing harmful algal blooms that affect 70% of U.S. surface waters and cost over $2.2 billion annually to remediate. Beyond water pollution, the Haber-Bosch process consumes a disproportionate amount of energy and greenhouse gas emissions. There is an urgent need to reduce the environmental impacts of the anthropogenic nitrogen cycle.

 

Recovering ammonia from wastewater as a fertilizer, fuel, or commodity chemical is a promising method to meet this need, but requires ion-selective separations to extract high-purity ammonia from complex wastewater mixtures. In particular, we focus on reactive nitrogen separations that both transform and purify nitrogen from complex wastewaters. This seminar will focus on our recent work designing nitrogen-selective processes, materials, and molecular mechanisms to recover and sense ammonia in wastewaters.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. William Tarpeh is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University.  The Tarpeh Lab develops and evaluates selective separations in “waste” waters at several synergistic scales: molecular mechanisms of chemical transport and transformation; novel unit processes that increase resource efficiency; and systems-level assessments that identify optimization opportunities. Will completed his B.S. in chemical engineering at Stanford, his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering at UC Berkeley, and postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan in environmental engineering. Will has recently been honored as an Environmental Science & Technology Early Career Scientist, Forbes' "30 Under 30" 2019 Science List, Gulf Research Program Early Career Fellowship, and Chemical and Engineering News Talented 12.

Fall 2020 Seminars

Sewershed Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2

Blythe Layton
Faculty Research Associate

Monday, Sept. 28
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Sewershed surveillance, also known as wastewater-based epidemiology, has emerged as a cost-effective and sensitive method of monitoring community incidence of the novel coronavirus worldwide. While optimal methods for concentrating the virus from wastewater are still under evaluation, the approach has shown a promising ability to detect community infection prior to reported cases, and also has clear advantages in the context of limited availability of clinical tests. In this seminar I will present our work monitoring wastewater throughout Oregon for SARS-CoV-2 using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), focusing on our spatially intensive study in Newport conducted in partnership with the TRACE team.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Blythe Layton earned her doctorate in environmental engineering and science at Stanford University in 2011. She was formerly a scientist in the Microbiology Department at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project in Costa Mesa, California. Currently, she is a faculty research associate with Tyler Radniecki and Christine Kelly in CBEE. Her research has focused on molecular methods of detecting indicator bacteria and pathogens in environmental waters and wastewater, with a special emphasis on microbial source tracking in the coastal environment.

Thaddeus Golden

Observing Biomolecules at Two- and Three-Dimensional Interfaces

Thaddeus W. Golbek
Postdoctoral Research - Aarhus University, Denmark

Monday, October 5
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

The biomolecule-membrane interface is one of most important and complex subjects in biology. Biomolecules can interact and manipulate the cellular membrane and the surrounding- they can transport ions, alter the lipid structure, and act as artificial receptors.  Despite the importance for surface engineering and drug development, the molecular mechanisms behind interfacial biomolecule action have largely remained elusive. We use ultrafast sum frequency generation spectroscopy combined with computer simulations to determine the structure and the mode of action by which these biomolecules interact with and manipulate interfaces.

Our aim is understanding biomolecule-membrane interactions at the molecular level. With our spectroscopy technique, we can observe antibiotic action of lasalocid acid and docking of molecules such as lysozyme.  As we shed light on more complex questions, coupling spectroscopy with computer simulations allows us to determine the mode of action for large biomolecules.  The majority of work in this field has been done on flat model interfaces.  This limits some important membrane properties such as membrane fluidity and dimensionality – important factors in biomolecule-membrane interactions.  To move towards three-dimensional nanoscopic interfaces, we utilize sum frequency scattering spectroscopy to interrogate the surface of vesicles and 3D lipid monolayers.  We have used this technique to follow the membrane action of lysozyme and shed light on a novel, engineered apoptosis-inducing receptor.  I will discuss the development and capabilities of SFG for addressing biological questions, and the ability of SFG to observe bimolecular interaction at interfaces.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Thaddeus received his bachelor of arts in both chemistry and physics from Pacific Lutheran University in 2013. Afterwards he went on to Oregon State University where he received a Master of Science in Chemical Engineering in 2015 and in 2018 a Ph. D. in Chemical Engineering.  During his time at Oregon State University he wrote a his dissertation titled, “Probing Structure, Selectivity, and Orientation of Biomolecules to Cell Membranes by Sum Frequency Generation” while working in Dr. Joe Baio’s lab. During his time at Oregon State, Thaddeus received an International Max Planck Research School Fellowship to conduct research for a couple months in Mainz, Germany at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research.  After graduating from Oregon State University, he received a postdoctoral research position at Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark.  Currently he is funded by a postdoctoral grant from the Lundbeck Foundation in Denmark for his current research on drug delivery, specifically the formation of the protein corona on nanoparticle medicines.

Amro Badawy
Nanotechnology: A Double-Edged Sword

Amro El Badawy
Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering

California Polytechnic State University

Monday, October 12
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Nanotechnology offers promising solutions to a multitude of global issues. It has applications in medicine, electronics, environmental remediation, food and agriculture, renewable energy and consumer products among others. In the meantime, concerns exist about the environmental, health and safety implications of nanotechnology. Therefore, nanotechnology is viewed as a double-edged sword. My presentation will provide an overview of research I have been conducting on both the benefits and risks of nanotechnology. This research includes identification of key factors that govern the toxic impacts as well as the environmental fate and transport of nanomaterials, developing colorimetric nanosensors for detection of pathogens in water, and investigating metal organic frameworks for post combustion capture of CO2. I will also discuss a pedagogical research project that I participated in to integrate nanotechnology into the STEM curriculum at Cal Poly. 

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Dr. Amro El Badawy is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). He earned his PhD in Environmental Engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 2011. His PhD research focused on evaluating the toxic impacts as well as the environmental fate and transport of engineered nanomaterials. At Cal Poly, Dr. El Badawy’s research focuses on developing nanosensors for rapid detection of microbial contamination in water, membrane-based solutions for water desalination and reclamation, and solid sorbents for post-combustion capture of CO2.

Inkjet Printing of Perovskites for Breaking Performance-Temperature Tradeoffs in Fabric-Based Thermistors

Shujie Li
Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering

Oregon State University

Monday, October 19
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

A novel low-temperature route is developed for inkjet printing of the perovskite Cs2SnI­6, to create wearable Negative-Temperature-Coefficient (NTC) thermistors with unprecedented performance on thermally sensitive fabrics. A low processing temperature of 120°C is achieved by creating a stable and printable ink using binary metal iodide salts, which is thermally transformed into dense Cs2SnI­6 crystals after printing. The optimally printed Cs2SnI6 shows a temperature measurement range up to 120°C, high sensitivity (4400K) and temperature coefficient of resistivity (0.05℃-1), and stability under ambient environmental conditions and bending. The approach breaks a critical tradeoff that has hindered wearable fabric-based thermistors by enabling damage-free fabrication of devices with commercially comparable performance, evincing significant applications in multifunctional textiles and beyond.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Shujie Li is 4th year Ph.D. candidate in Chemical Engineering from Orgon State University. He got a bachelor's degree in Material Science at Jiangsu University in China, 2012. After a few years of experience in the industry, He decided to pursue the master degree in chemical engineering at OSU and started his Ph.D.  program at 2017 in Dr. Chih-Hung Chang’s Lab. Current research interests are focusing on the solution-processed fabrication and characterization of metal oxide, metal halide, perovskite thin film on textile.

 

Quantitative MRI Techniques for Spinal Pathology: A Snapshot

Sonia Ahrens
Masters Student in BioEngineering

Oregon State University

ABSTRACT

Herniated discs are a highly prevalent injury which can cause debilitating back pain, and typically requires surgical intervention. Diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from back pain usually relies on MRI as a non-invasive method of clinical evaluation. This typically involves a simple qualitative assessment of MR T1/T2-weighted images by a radiologist or surgeon. Our lab is currently investigating diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as a supplemental imaging modality for the assessment of disc degradation. Image processing was used to quantitatively compare the capability of each modality at visualizing key disc structures, and animal models experiments are currently underway to validate these results.

Image processing for the spine also shows promise in a clinical setting. Our lab has pursued a related project as a startup which aims to predict a common complication for spine surgery patients: reherniation. Our team has successfully created a predictive tool capable of compiling multiple risk factors for reherniation and reporting a single unified probability of risk. However, we have determined that physician inter-evaluator variability in measuring model input metrics from radiographs and MRI can compromise the accuracy of the model. Therefore, the current objective of this project is to create a new technology that minimizes this variability in patient evaluation using fully automated image processing by machine learning.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Sonia Ahrens (BS, Bioengineering OSU) is a graduate research and teaching assistant in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. She is pursuing her M.S. in bioengineering under Dr. Morgan Giers on the topic of image processing and computational modeling as tools to evaluate intervertebral disc degeneration and spinal pathology. Her current work involves development of techniques for automated data collection to improve consistency of patient evaluation.

Advancing the College of Engineering's Strategic Goals of Providing Transformative Education and Cultivating a Collaborative and Inclusive Community

Michelle Bothwell
Professor

Monday, October 26
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

The College of Engineering at Oregon State has committed to becoming a community of faculty, students, and staff that is increasingly more inclusive, collaborative, diverse, and centered on student success. Over the past few years, I have worked with several research teams to further this commitment through engaging projects focused on both student and faculty experiences. This presentation will provide a summary of some of these efforts, including: engineering students’ perceptions of belonging through the lens of social identity; advancing the study and practice of equity, inclusion, and social justice for tenured and tenure-track faculty in STEM; and development of a qualitative instrument to measure conceptual understanding of oppression and privilege.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Michelle Bothwell completed engineering degrees at Purdue University (B.S.) and Cornell University (Ph.D.), before joining Oregon State University with teaching and research interests in bioengineering. She is currently a professor in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering. Michelle has contributed to new program development and improvement to engineering curricula, leading efforts to integrate professional engineering ethics, social and political responsibilities and social justice topics in innovative and compelling ways. Her more recent research interests have centered on the interrogation of engineering culture using feminist methodologies, and the transformation of academic intuitions toward equitable, inclusive and socially just workplaces.

Understanding Cellular-Particle Interactions in Blood: Implications for Disease Pathology and Treatment

Lola Eniola-Adefeso
Professor

University of Michigan

Monday, November 2
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Localized delivery of therapeutics offers the possibility of increased drug effectiveness while minimizing side effects often associated with systemic drug administration.  Factors that influence the likelihood of targeted particle therapeutics to reach the vascular wall are the ability to identify: 1) a disease-specific target, 2) the appropriate drug carrier type and geometry for efficient interaction with the vascular wall, and 3) a drug-carrier combination that allows for the desired release of the targeted therapeutics. Existing literature has focused on identifying target epitopes and the degradation/drug release characteristics of a wide range of drug-carrier formulations.  Our work focuses on probing the role of particle geometry, material chemistry, and blood rheology/dynamics on the ability of vascular-targeted drug carriers to interact with the blood vessel wall - an important consideration that will control the effectiveness of drug targeting regardless of the targeted disease or delivered therapeutically. This presentation will highlight the carrier-blood cell interactions that affect drug carrier binding to the vascular wall and alter critical neutrophil functions in disease. The talk will present the optimal drug carrier geometry for active and passive use of VTC in the treatment of many inflammatory diseases.    

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Lola Eniola completed Biomolecular engineering degrees at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (B.S.) and University of Pennsylvania (MSE and Ph.D.), She is currently University Diversity and Social Transformation Professor of Chemical Engineering, Vice Chair of Graduate Studies in Chemical Engineering and Miller Faculty Scholar at the University of Michigan. Her research goal at University of Michigan is to use knowledge of the cellular inflammatory response and flood flow dynamics to design bio-functionalized particles for targeted drug delivery and imaging. Lola also serves as Deputy Editor for "Science Advances."

Effects of Water on Acetic Acid Decomposition on Pt (111)

Kingsley Chukwu
Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering

Oregon State University

Monday, November 9
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Important chemical processes like biomass conversion to biofuels, rely on heterogenous catalytic reaction in solvents like water. Experimental studies have shown that solvents affect the selectivity and rate of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Despite all these studies, there is a lack of fundamental understanding on how these solvents influence these heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Acetic acid decomposition on Pt (111) is a good model to study solvent effects on small oxygenates found in biomass conversion. Here, we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain atomic scale insight into how water affects acetic acid decomposition on Pt (111). Our results suggest that the presence of water affects the most favorable reaction pathway and increases the selectivity towards carbon dioxide formation while decreasing the selectivity towards carbon monoxide during acetic acid decomposition over Pt (111).

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Kingsley C. Chukwu is a Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He earned his B.Sc. in Pure and Industrial Chemistry from University of Nigeria, Nsukka (2014) in Enugu State, Nigeria. His research involves the use of computational quantum mechanical modelling methods to study the influence of solvents on catalytic reactions on noble metal surfaces.

The Transition of Wastewater Surveillance from a Promising Tool to a Reliable Leading Indicator: Evaluating Methods for SARS-Co-V-2 Virus Quantification"

Andrea George
Masters Student in Environmental Engineering

Oregon State University

ABSTRACT

Wastewater surveillance has become a tool used worldwide to track the spread of COVID-19. In conjunction with clinical testing, it can help locate outbreaks for appropriate management. While there are clear benefits to the practice, there is still work to be done before all potential cases can be captured in a "sewershed", especially at low-flow sites like individual businesses and buildings on university campuses. This presentation will focus on some of the facets of the work where scientific knowledge can be expanded, and the tests that have been conducted at Clean Water Services to determine effective methods of sample collection and virus concentration. 

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Andrea George is a second-year M.S. student in Environmental Engineering working in Dr. Tyler Radniecki's lab. She is currently working at Clean Water Services to facilitate the collaboration between the water resources management utility and Oregon State University as they conduct multiple projects to track the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon communities. Her work focuses on the optimization of wasterwater collection and virus concentration methods in order to quantify SARS-Co-V-2 in the wastewater matrix.

Attack Helicopters and White Supremacy: Interpreting Malicious Responses to an Online Questionnaire for Transgender Undergraduate Engineering and Computer Science Students

Andrea Haverkamp
Ph.D. Candidate

Oregon State University

Monday, November 16
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Questionnaires geared towards marginalized communities and administered online may receive malicious responses from individuals who aren’t the intended audience. These respondents may aim to mislead and harass researchers. Malicious survey responses not only skew data, but also bring harm to the research team whose identities become targeted. Our goal is to identify and interpret malicious responses which were recorded in a national online questionnaire for transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) undergraduate engineering students using antifascist and trans methodologies, which theorize on the mechanisms of discourse to form power in society. The questionnaire was distributed to engineering and computer science programs nationally. Data categorized as malicious contained slurs, hate speech, or direct targeting of the research team. The data was coded inductively and discursively interpreted through queer, trans, and antifascist methodologies. 51 responses expressed overt white supremacist ideology and explicitly malicious sentiment compared to 301 responses categorized as valid. The responses contained graphic anti-LGBTQ, anti-trans, anti-Black, anti-Jewish, anti-Indigenous, and Islamophobic content. Online slang associated with alt-right subcultures were also present. Malicious responses to surveys on marginalized student experiences provide critical insight into social conditions in engineering education programs and should be interpreted, not disregarded. Respondents who targeted this questionnaire demonstrated characteristics associated with contemporary online white nationalist radicalization and increasingly mainstream political discourse. We believe political engagement is an urgent cultural point of intervention in undergraduate engineering education relating to exclusion and marginalization. These findings should inform further study and theorization on gendered oppression and political engagement in engineering undergraduate culture in order to protect the safety and inclusion of TGNC students. 

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Andrea Haverkamp is a PhD candidate in Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University, with a minor in Queer Studies. She will defend her dissertation in December, titled "Invisible Gender Experiences: Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Students in Engineering and Computer Science.”  She serves on the editorial board for the International Journal of Engineering, Social Justice, and Peace and is President of the Coalition of Graduate Employees, the labor union representing the collective voice of graduate research and teaching assistants at Oregon State University.

Community Engagement and Distributed Sampling to Accelerate Hydrobiogeochemical Discovery across River Corridors

Vanessa Garayburu-Caruso
Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory                                                                  Chemistry Team Lead for Worldwide Hydrobiogeochemistry Observation Network for Dynamic River Systems consortium                                                                                       

and 

Lupita Renteria                                                                                                                                        Post Bachelor's Research Assistant                                                                                                Pacific Northwest National Laboratory      

Monday, November 23
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Characterizing river corridors across spatiotemporal scales requires collection and synthesis of data across diverse environments while balancing the resource costs of distributed studies. Scientific innovation is enhanced by multidisciplinary perspectives and community efforts. These needs were considered in tandem to create the Worldwide Hydrobiogeochemistry Observation Network for Dynamic River Systems (WHONDRS), which is founded upon an ICON framework that integrates biological, physical, and chemical processes across scales; coordinates with consistent methods; is open across the research lifecycle; and networks with collaborators. WHONDRS is a global consortium that relies on a community-enabled, distributed sampling approach to understand coupled hydrologic, biogeochemical, and microbial functions in river corridors. The WHONDRS consortium designs sampling campaigns that target specific spatial and temporal scales, modifies its approach based on community input, and then sends free sampling kits out to collaborators. All WHONDRS data are openly accessible through DOE’s data repository for environmental systems science (https://data.ess-dive.lbl.gov/). In this presentation we describe a variety of community science efforts conducted by the WHONDRS consortium that used Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) to characterize metabolomes in surface waters, porewaters and sediments across different scales and hydrologic conditions. We describe the distribution of key aspects of metabolomes including elemental groups, chemical classes, indices, and inferred biochemical transformations.  We encourage the scientific community to connect with WHONDRS, explore datasets and combine them with additional data products to pursue novel scientific questions at local to global scales, and to further engage with and pursue science that embodies the ICON principles.

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS

Vanessa Garayburu-Caruso 

Vanessa is an Environmental Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as well as the Chemistry Team Lead for the Worldwide Hydrobiogeochemistry Observation Network for Dynamic River Systems (WHONDRS) consortium. In this role, she supervises and coordinates staff, laboratory activities and chemical analysis performed by WHONDRS. Her research focuses on understanding river corridor biogeochemical processes and changes in organic matter chemistry across scales. She received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Universidad Simon Bolivar, in Venezuela and a M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of New Mexico

Lupita Renteria

Lupita is a Post-Bachelors Research Assistant at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She has been at the lab since March of 2016 Through her time, she has been a part of a variety of projects under the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Research Program and a key contributor to the   Worldwide Hydrobiogeochemistry Observation Network for Dynamic River Systems (WHONDRS) consortium. Lupita has significant experience leading and conducting laboratory and field experiments. In 2018, she received a B.S degree in Biology from Washington State University.

Machine Learning for an Atomistically-Resolved View into Materials Under Extreme Conditions

Rebecca K. Lindsey
Materials Science Division, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory                                                                                                                  Livermore, California                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Monday, November 30
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 984 7239 8176
Passcode: 894104


ABSTRACT

Understanding evolution of organic molecular materials (OMMs) subject to extreme temperature and pressure conditions (e.g. 1000s of K and 10s of GPa) is crucial to fields spanning astrobiology to nanomaterial fabrication. However, a clear picture of this phenomena remains elusive due to a confluence of challenges. Experimentally, for example, these conditions are typically realized by subjecting samples to shockwaves via an external driver or detonation. Ensuing material evolution is rapid (e.g. occurring over nano-to-microsecond timescales) and often highly multiscaled (e.g. where reactivity, phase separation, and material strength are determined on approximately <1 nm, 100 nm, and 1 μm scales, respectively); as a result, direct experimental determination of properties as fundamental as temperature is intractable.

Atomistic simulations can be a powerful tool for shock experiment interpretation by both providing an atomistically-resolved view into OMM evolution and providing inputs (e.g. equation of state, chemical kinetics, etc.) necessary for larger-scale (e.g. continuum) models. However, characteristic problem scales approaching a μm and μs preclude use of  highly predictive first principles-based simulation approaches (e.g. Kohn-Sham density functional theory), and existing molecular mechanics-based interatomic models are generally not designed for such high temperature and pressure conditions.

In this seminar we discuss development and application of ChIMES, a machine-learned reactive interatomic model capable of quantum accuracy at a fraction of the computational cost, which has been developed to overcome these challenges. We present first-of-their-kind simulations using these models, which predicted nanocarbon formation (i.e. a condensed-phase reaction-driven phase separation process) from a shock compressed system thereby answering decades long questions pertaining to the kinetics of detonation nanodiamond production. Challenges surrounding development of robust and high-fidelity machine learned interatomic models for OMMs are discussed, and other applications of ChIMES are briefly surveyed.

This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-815611.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Rebecca received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Wayne State University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from the University of  Minnesota, Twin Cities. She was a postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), where she is currently a Staff Research Scientist. Her work in computational chemistry, for which applications have spanned sorption in soft materials, possible mechanisms for the origins of life, and detonation synthesis of unusual carbon nanoparticles, has been underpinned by a strong interest in developing tools enabling work in previously inaccessible problem space. Her efforts were recently recognized through a LLNL Physical and Life Sciences Directorate Research Award. In addition to her work in computational chemistry, she leverages data science and machine learning tools to aid in interpretation of large experimental datasets and develop age-aware material performance models from them.

Spring 2020 Seminars

May Nyman

Building materials from molecular clusters

May Nyman
Oregon State University

Monday, March 30
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 394-882-200


ABSTRACT

Metal-oxo clusters are modular building blocks for materials via hydrolysis reactions and coordination chemistry. Landmark discoveries in cluster-based materials include zeolites and MOFs. Understanding and controlling solution phase reaction pathways from monomers to clusters to materials (and vice versa) will lead to new discoveries from across the periodic table, and most aspirational, the next new class of cluster-based materials.

This seminar will present an overview of studies of metal-oxo clusters and their importance in functional materials and understanding reaction pathways, beginning with an introduction to small-angle X-ray scattering as a primary tool in studying cluster systems. Time permitting, presented cluster systems will include: supramolecular assembly and fractals of heterometallic U(IV) clusters and materials; diversifying Zr/Hf oxocluster chemistry with peroxide (and use in microelectronics); and behavior of Nb-polyoxometalates around neutral pH.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

May Nyman has a multidisciplinary education with a BSc in Geology, an MSc in materials science and engineering, and a PhD in Chemistry. She worked at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque New Mexico from 1998-2012 in the environmental and energy sector, before accepting a faculty position in the Department of Chemistry at Oregon State University, where she has been since. May’s expertise include X-ray scattering and solution speciation of metal-oxo clusters, thin film materials, ion separations, POM chemistry and actinide chemistry. 

Unravelling pore-scale processes in geomaterials

Veerle Cnudde
Research Professor
Ghent University, Belgium

Monday, April 6
9-9:50 a.m.
Zoom ID: 386-859-878


ABSTRACT

Physical, chemical and biological weathering has a constant effect on the earth’s landscape. This also impacts our building infrastructure, as stone and masonry are damaged by a combination of different processes, such as chemical attack, biological colonization, water infiltration and changes in temperature. Fluid flow, reactive transport, nucleation, dissolution, precipitation and mass transport are crucial processes occurring inside the pore system of geomaterials. To fully understand the macroscopical behavior of geomaterials in this context, their pore scale properties and processes have to be understood. The stone’s mineralogy and pore structure strongly affect key internal pore scale processes. These processes have been studied indirectly by micro- and macroscopic observations and laboratory experiments. Although this provides valuable information, the key drivers of these processes are to be studied at the pore scale. To explore these dynamic pore-scale processes, several non-destructive 3D and 4D methods are currently available. These tools provide additional important insights. Unravelling pore-scale processes in combination with pore scale modelling is an essential step towards understanding and predicting a geomaterial’s macroscopic behavior correctly. 

The presentation discusses the current possibilities and challenges in non-destructive pore-scale imaging of geomaterials and how this data can be used as input for fluid flow models and their validation. Additional new developments at the synchrotron and on lab-based X-ray systems related to material characterization as well as to the understanding of pore-scale processes are discussed. Examples will be given of different experiments related to the characterization and the imaging of dynamic pore scale processes in (geo)materials.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Professor Veerle Cnudde received a doctorate in geology in 2005 from Ghent University (Belgium), where she has been a research professor since 2010. She is team leader of PProGRess, the Pore-scale Processes in Geomaterials Research group (Dept. of Geology, UGent) and is one of the coordinators of the Ghent University Expertise Centre for X-Ray Tomography. She was one of the co-founders of the UGCT spin-off company Inside Matters, which later merged with the spin-off company XRE, now part of TESCAN. She specializes in non-destructive imaging of geomaterials and has a strong expertise in real-time imaging of processes in the pore space. Research projects which she has initiated are strongly linked to weathering and fluid flow processes of porous sedimentary rocks, as well as conservation of building stones.

Microstructure and Mechanical Response at the Cellular Scale in Animal Models of Osteoarthritis and Spinal Disc Degeneration

Brian K. Bay
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Oregon State University

Monday, April 13
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 711-172-648


Abstract

Research utilizing in situ (mechanically loaded) volumetric imaging and digital volume correlation (DVC) is growing rapidly as quality of and access to imaging equipment improves, with tissue biomechanics emerging as an important application area. This presentation describes recent research utilizing synchrotron-based phase-contrast microCT for the study of intact knee joints (mouse Str/ORT osteoarthritis model) and intervertebral discs (rat simulated injury and degeneration model) subjected to physiologically relevant mechanical loading. Collection of imaging data, pre-processing for microstructure-based DVC, and post-processing of functional response data will be described. Subtle differences in both mineralized tissues (distinction between articular calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in the subarticular region) and soft-tissues (tracking of individual collagen fiber bundles) will be demonstrated, based on imaging at cellular levels of resolution.

About the presenter

Brian Bay is an associate professor in the Materials/Mechanics group in the School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering at Oregon State University.

He received all of his degrees from the University of California, Davis, progressing through programs in materials science, mechanical engineering, and biomedical engineering, with a Ph.D. granted in 1992. He then transitioned to postdoctoral and assistant research faculty positions with the Orthopedic Surgery Department at the School of Medicine at University of California, Davis.

Tissue biomechanics experimentation and x-ray microtomography merged within that environment in the form of Digital Volume Correlation (DVC), a methodology first demonstrated by Dr. Bay in a publication that received the Hetényi award from the Society for Experimental Mechanics in 2001. Increasing adoption of DVC within the research community led to granting of the Founders Award from the International Digital Image Correlation Society in 2016, and Dr. Bay now serves on the Board of Directors.

Current research is exploring methods of improving volumetric correlation through explicit microstructure linkages, sub-micron scale tissue biomechanics studies utilizing in situ phase contrast synchrotron x-ray tomography and advancing the application of image correlation methods in non-traditional areas such as advanced manufacturing, with Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of metal powders a particular interest.

Dr. Bay has active collaborations with researchers and facilities in the UK (University College London, University of Manchester, Royal Veterinary College, Diamond Light Source, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) and has received support from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, the State of Oregon, and a variety of industry partners.

Engineering Epistemologies

Devlin Montfort
Associate Professor, Environmental Engineering

Oregon State University

Monday, April 20
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 974-324-699


ABSTRACT

Epistemology is the study of knowledge. I specifically study engineering knowledge (a thing) and knowing (a process), so I call that engineering epistemologies. It’s not a big field, but it is important.  Engineers’ use, communicate, certify and change their knowledge in very particular ways. I study all that mostly through interviews and observations that I then go through over and over to look for patterns. I’ve found four ways engineering thinking is unusual. You may already be familiar with these patterns, but I think it’s helpful to name them:

  1. Engineers’ thinking, learning and knowing are all directed toward goals.
  2. Engineering thinking is inherently iterative.
  3. Engineering thinking and knowledge almost always rely on some kind of model. 
  4. Engineers use strategic estimation to solve problems efficiently. 

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Devlin is from the Pacific Northwest and has never lived anywhere else. He’s been part of CBEE since 2013. He is a triple-diplomate of Washington State University, where he earned his doctorate in civil engineering in 2011

 

The SIR Dynamic Model of Infectious Disease Transmission from the Viewpoint of a Chemical Engineer

Cory Simon 
Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering
Oregon State University

Monday, April 27
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 471-278-737 


Abstract 

Mathematical models of the dynamics of infectious disease transmission are useful for forecasting epidemics, assessing intervention strategies, and inferring properties of diseases. The classical Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR) epidemic model resembles a dynamic model of a batch reactor carrying out an auto-catalytic reaction with catalyst deactivation.

About the presenter

Cory Simon earned his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Akron, studied mathematics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada for two years, and earned his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Cory is currently an assistant professor at Oregon State University in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering. His research group employs molecular models and simulations, machine learning, and statistical mechanics to discover nanoporous materials for gas storage, separations, and sensing. 

Chemical reactions on surfaces, from heterogeneous catalysis to corrosion

Líney Árnadóttir
Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering
Oregon State University

Monday, May 4 
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 445-143-248


Abstract

Chemical reactions on surfaces play an important role in many technologies, civil infrastructure, and chemical conversion. Understanding the mechanism and kinetics of these reactions can assist in the design of more efficient and selective chemical processes and more durable materials. In our group, we take a bottom-up approach using electron-structure calculations and statistical mechanics approaches to gain insights into surface interactions and the energy landscape of surface reactions or degradation. These approaches build the foundation for additional microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and kinetic models of the reaction network which allow us to study more complex molecular systems and predict how change in the catalyst affects individual reaction steps and the overall selectivity of the reactions network.  Our research efforts  include experimental components conducted within our group and through collaboration  to provide  a more holistic view of the various chemical processes at work.

This seminar will provide an overview of the research efforts in the Arnadottir Research Group related to surface reactions focusing on two major research threads: solvent effect in heterogeneous catalysis and corrosion.

About the presenter

Líney Árnadóttir earned her BSc in Chemistry at the University of Iceland and her MS and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Washington, where she studied the role of water in electrooxidation of methanol using a combined computational and experimental approach. Before coming to OSU she held a post-doctoral research position at the University of Washington using various surface analysis techniques to study model surfaces for biomaterial applications.

Karl Mundorff

From Research to Societal Impact, Resources for Faculty, Post Docs and Graduate Students

Karl Mundorff
Executive Director for Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Oregon State University

Monday, May 11
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 849-283-131


Abstract

This seminar demonstrates OSU resources available for faculty, post docs and graduate students to maximize the impact of their research through technology and market development pathways.

About the presenter

Karl Mundorff is the Executive Director for Innovation and Entrepreneurship providing strategic leadership and directs operational oversight of innovation and entrepreneurship through the Research Office’s OSU Advantage initiative.  Part of that responsibility is being the Co-Director of OSU’s Advantage Accelerator, the Principal Investigator on the University’s NSF Innovation Corps Site grant.  He Co-Chair’s the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Roundtable which evaluates, develops and leverages I&E programs and activities across the OSU footpring.

He was recently the Director of Research Programs for VertueLab, a State Signature Research Center advancing the Cleantech cluster.  He played an integral role in securing an Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership designation from the Economic Development Administration and is serving on a steering committee for Business Oregon overseeing an Innovation and Entrepreneurship strategy.  Among many entrepreneurial endeavors, Karl served as President and CEO of BioReaction Industries which commercialized an air pollution control technology utilizing microbes to digest industrial process exhaust, growing the company from prototype to commercial success with engagements with Fortune 500 companies on three continents.

May Nyman

Progress in the Development of ‘Paper’ Microfluidic Devices for Precision Health Applications

Elain Fu
Associate Professor, Bioengineering
Oregon State University

Monday, May 18
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 143-219-596


ABSTRACT

High-performance assays that are easy to use and cost effective, and that can make rapid measurements on clinically-useful analytes, are needed for use in field settings for many health-related applications. The conventional lateral flow test is well suited for a number of point-of-care applications in the lowest-resource settings. However, for many analytes of interest, conventional lateral flow tests lack the sensitivity or quantitative resolution to have clinical utility. The rapidly growing field of ‘paper’ microfluidics is working to address these issues. In particular, we are developing devices composed of porous materials that can perform multi-step sample processing for use in field settings. Key to the successful operation of these devices is the development of methods to manipulate small volumes of fluids and quantify the level of molecular species of interest within them. This presentation will highlight progress in the development of paper microfluidic devices in the context of applications for infectious disease diagnosis (e.g., influenza) and therapy monitoring (e.g., for phenylketonuria treatment).

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Elain Fu is an associate professor of bioengineering at Oregon State University. Elain received a Sc.B. in Physics from Brown University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from the University of Maryland, College Park. Prior to joining Oregon State University in 2013, Elain served as a research scientist and then as research faculty in Bioengineering at the University of Washington. She has published over 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals and is a co-inventor on multiple patents.

Opportunities and Challenges in Materials Characterization for Emerging Nanoscale Device Technologies

Markus Kuhn
Principal Engineer
Intel

Monday, June 1 
4-4:50 p.m.
Zoom ID: 902-984-808


Abstract

Advanced CMOS technology development has evolved from the use of geometric scaling to the introduction of novel materials and 3D architectures.  These inclusions have added significant complexity to all aspects of process development and also for the fab and lab metrologies that support the development and manufacturing of those processes.  Furthermore, the exploration of novel memory and beyond CMOS technology options will require the development of metrologies targeted at measuring unique device properties (i.e. magnetism, polarization, spin, etc). Much of the focus is on advancing dimensional metrology capabilities such as TEM, SEM, CDSAXS, etc. However, similar attention must be given to other device and material properties and the impact of increased process sensitivities and variations i.e. the measurement and control of the properties of atomically thin films and interfaces.  Since lab-based methods are generally more suited to provide these enhanced capabilities, there is an increasing trend to use lab methods in a hybrid/near-fab approach. This requires the development of lab metrology tools that provide improved efficiency, accelerated time to data, and high reliability, all at a lower cost of ownership.  Overall, it is a unique challenge that involves development and integration of advanced analysis capabilities, emerging machine learning applications and equipment supplier ecosystems. 

About the presenter

Markus Kuhn received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada.  After postdoctoral positions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Tulane University he joined Digital Equipment Corporation where he worked on the development of advanced characterization methods to support future CMOS technology nodes.  After Intel’s acquisition of DEC’s semiconductor division in 1998, he transferred to Intel’s Technology Development site in Hillsboro, Oregon where he joined the Corporate Quality Network Lab group.  He is currently a Principal Engineer, tasked with leading Intel’s materials characterization pathfinding efforts.  Dr. Kuhn has published 100+ refereed papers with a focus on the surface science of catalytic systems, thin film growth and the properties of new materials for semiconductor applications and has also coauthored a book chapter on the application of transistor strain methods.  He holds 30+ patents in the areas of high k/metal gate, FinFET, and strain development for semiconductor applications.  His research interests include the advancement of analytical capabilities for nanoscale devices and he has a broader interest in the synergies between analytical characterization methods, machine learning and process metrology to help enable emerging nanoscale device technologies.

Winter 2020 Seminars

Tyler Radniecki

Creating more effective biological stormwater and wastewater treatment systems

Tyler Radniecki
Oregon State University

Monday, Jan. 6
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001

 

Abstract

The efficient capture, treatment and extraction of resources from contaminated waters is a critical need in an era of increased population growth and decreased fresh water supplies.  For example, stormwater is the leading source of pollutants to near-shore waterways but also represents a viable source of fresh water to be used for environmental restoration and human uses.  Bioswales are a cost-effective stormwater treatment technology but do not effectively remove dissolved contaminants as currently designed.  The lessons learned about proper bioswale design after 5 years of study at the OSU-Benton County Green Stormwater Infrastructure Research facility will be presented.  Additional future research needs directions will be also be presented.

Wastewater is another highly contaminated viable source of fresh water that requires energy intensive treatment processes.  However, the addition of external waste carbon sources, such as fats, oils and greases, can boost methane production in anaerobic digesters to levels that will fully power the entire treatment facility. While viable in practice, the system is prone to failure.  Complicating matters is an incomplete understanding of the microbial ecology within these FOG co-digesting anaerobic digesters. The lessons learned about how to shape microbial community structures in lab-scale anaerobic digesters to enhance performance will be presented.  Additional future research needs about predicting anaerobic digester performance based on community composition will also be presented.

 

About Dr. Radniecki

Tyler S. Radniecki is an associate professor of environmental engineering in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. His research focuses on sustainable stormwater and wastewater treatment processes with a particular emphasis on understanding the fundamental mechanisms involved in biological treatment systems. Dr. Radniecki is the co-director of the OSU-Benton County Green Stormwater Infrastructure Research facility located in Corvallis.  His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, Department of Agriculture, state agencies and Oregon municipalities. In 2019, Dr. Radniecki received the National Science Foundation’s CAREER award to pursue his work on predictably shaping microbial communities in engineered systems to enhance biological treatment processes. Dr. Radniecki received his bachelor of science in environmental science from Bemidji State University and his master of science and doctorate in chemical and environmental engineering from Yale University.

 

Stephen Meyers

Metal-Oxide Photoresists for EUV Lithography: Chasing Photons with Tiny Buckets

Stephen Meyers
Inpria Corp.

Monday, Jan. 13
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001

 

Abstract

Semiconductor scaling, which underpins much of the digital world we live in, has historically been driven by advances in photolithography. From this perspective, the adoption of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography currently underway in the semiconductor industry is business as usual: revolution, reinvention, and reengineering. The basic materials of lithography are included in this upheaval – photoresists and their ancillaries will require fundamental changes to unlock the full potential of high-NA EUV imaging. Metal-based photoresists are a leading candidate for these advanced nodes and the chemistry, metrology, and integration challenges associated with bringing these materials to high-volume manufacturing present creative opportunities to materials scientists and engineers.

 

About Dr. Meyers

Stephen Meyers is the director of resist development at Inpria Corp., a Corvallis startup pioneering the development of metal-oxide EUV photoresists. He joined Inpria at its inception in 2008 after receiving his doctorate in inorganic chemistry from Oregon State University, where he researched solution deposited oxide electronics under Professor Douglas Keszler.

As a chemist at Inpria, Meyers has contributed to the company’s continued growth and technical leadership through the design and synthesis of functional chemistries for inorganic semiconductor, dielectric, resist and hardmask materials for display, optical, and lithographic applications. He currently leads a team of chemists responsible for the development and integration of metal-oxide photoresist chemistries and related processes for EUV lithography at the 5 nm node and beyond. 

James Wetmore

Nanotechnology at the start of the millennium: A look back at the excitement and fear

Jameson Wetmore
Arizona State University

Monday, Jan. 27
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001 

About Dr. Wetmore

Jamey Wetmore is an associate professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and co-director of the Center for Engagement and Training in Science and Society at Arizona State University. His work combines the fields of science and technology studies, ethics, and public policy in order to better understand how people shape technologies and, in turn, how technologies shape people. His research spans a broad array of topics and time periods, but most of it comes back to a recurring question: How do people design and create technological systems and, in turn, how do these technological systems help to define, reinforce and propagate specific values? He has worked in areas as varied as the Amish use of technology, automobile safety, computer science in East Africa, and nanotechnology. Much of this work is summed up in his co-edited book: "Technology and Society: Building our Sociotechnical Future" (MIT Press). He currently serves as the associate director for societal and ethical implications of the National Science Foundation's National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure Coordinating Office where he works to integrate the social studies of nanotechnology into the technical development of the field. 

Kyriakos Stylianou

Rational design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks for carbon capture

Kyriakos Stylianou
Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry
Oregon State University

Monday, Feb. 3
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001

Abstract 

The discovery of porous materials for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) separation requires tailor-designed pores that can selectively capture CO2 over other prominent flue gas components (nitrogen, water). Herein, we report a rational materials design method that involves high-throughput computational screening and mining similar pore binding sites for strong CO2 adsorption and selectivity. Out of 325,000 hypothetically generated metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), we identified a new active site, suitable for a CO2 monolayer to adsorb. Two porous MOFs with this specific active site were synthesized, exhibiting outstanding stability upon activation and on exposure to various conditions. In-situ CO2 loading studies facilitate the identification of the active site, and the breakthrough profiles highlight that the CO2 separation performance of these MOFs and CO2/N2 selectivities remain unaffected under dry and humid post-combustion thermodynamic conditions.  

About Dr. Stylianou 

Dr. Kyriakos C. Stylianou was born in Larnaca, Cyprus. He received his PhD from the University of Liverpool under the supervision of Professor Matthew J. Rosseinsky and co-supervision of Professor Darren Bradshaw. Upon completion of his PhD, he was awarded with the prestigious Marie Curie fellowship and collaborated with Professor Daniel Maspoch at the Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology and Nanoscience. At EPFL Valais, he led the synthetic activity of the Laboratory of Molecular Simulation, and the research focus of his team was based on the synthesis of new porous materials for energy, environmental and sensing applications. In 2016, he was successful with the Ambizione Energy grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation to investigate the potential of MOFs as photocatalysts. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor in Chemistry at Oregon State University and his group’s research activity lies on the synthesis of new nanoporous materials namely metal-organic frameworks for carbon capture, photocatalytic hydrogen generation and water purification. 

Feng Gao

The first 10 years of fundamental research on Cu/SSZ-13
selective catalytic reduction catalysts: key contributions from PNNL

Feng Gao
Senior Staff Scientist
Institute for Integrated Catalysis
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory                                                                   

Monday, Feb. 10
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001

Abstract

Cu/SSZ-13 selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been commercialized for NOx (NO and NO2) abatement in diesel engine exhausts since about 2009. PNNL has been one of the first non-industrial institutions to conduct laboratory work to understand the nature of the active sites, reaction mechanisms, durability, and refinement of this important catalyst. In 2010, PNNL published the first open-literature paper addressing the improved activity and stability of Cu/SSZ-13 as compared to other zeolite-based SCR catalysts. Regarding the nature of the active sites, the PNNL team first proposed, based on spectroscopic investigations, that there are two distinct active Cu(II) species in this catalyst. Based on reaction kinetics and theoretical simulations, PNNL scientists first proposed that a “dual site” redox mechanism occurs for low-temperature standard SCR. In attempting to provide rational catalyst design principles for our industrial partners, PNNL scientists systematically investigated effects of catalyst composition (i.e., Si/Al and Cu/Al ratios), catalyst particle size, accelerated hydrothermal aging conditions, and cationic additives. Based on these parameters, in particular the distinct stability difference of the two active Cu(II) sites, PNNL scientists are now able to provide rational design suggestions based entirely on atomic-level fundamental understandings of this catalyst, rather than on trial-and-error. During the first decade of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalyst research, the PNNL team of scientists have published approximately 30 open-literature articles addressing various aspects of this catalyst. The work of PNNL scientists has been highly regarded in SCR research both in the US and internationally.

About Dr. Gao 

Feng Gao's interests involve the surface and interfacial chemistry in heterogeneous catalysis. Current research involves fundamental and applied studies of catalytic materials and processes for the control of vehicle exhaust emissions, including ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) and low-temperature passive NOx adsorption (PNA). Work has also been carried out in removing other harmful components in engine exhausts, including N2O and CH4 via decomposition and combustion routes, respectively. Another area of my research involves work in basic energy research aimed at developing atomic-level structure/function relationships in supported transition metal and metal oxide catalysts used in the upgrade of bio-derived chemicals.

 

Rene Boiteau

Ironing out metal speciation and bioavailability in alkaline soils

Rene Boiteau
Assistant Professor
Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

Monday, Feb. 17
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001

Abstract 

Understanding the sources, transformations, and biological impact of metals in the environment is needed to design sustainable practices for crop production, assess the fate and impact of harmful contaminants, and develop accurate climate models. Some metals are essential micronutrients while others are harmful contaminants, and their solubility and reactivities are largely controlled by organic molecules that strongly bind metals in dissolved forms. Identifying the origin, chemical composition, and selectivity of these organic chelating agents in environmental systems has remained a formidable analytical challenge, however, due to the complexity of natural dissolved organic matter. To address this challenge, our work employs state-of-the art liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based methods for confidently identifying metal-organic complexes from environmental samples. This talk will focus on investigations into the biological processes that govern metal dissolution and uptake in alkaline soils, where poor metal solubility is often a limiting factor for the growth of food and biofuel crops.

About Rene Boiteau 

Rene Boiteau is an Assistant Professor in Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University and holds a joint appointment at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He obtained his PhD from the MIT/WHOI joint program studying oceanic iron cycling, and was a Pauling Postdoctoral Fellow at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory where he studied how microbes and plants influence the speciation of micronutrient and contaminant in soils. His current research focuses on developing predictive knowledge of how metals and organic nutrients impact environmental and human health.

Finite Element Modeling of Organ Movement for Adaptive Treatment Planning for Prostate Cancer  
 

Yue Zhang

Yue Zhang

Monday, Feb. 24
4-4:50 p.m.
Kelley 1001

ABSTRACT

Organ movement during radiation therapy can be unavoidable in some cases and this poses challenges to dose planning in the radiation treatment-design. Numerical modeling of material deformation is a well-known strategy to aid deformable image registration. We present some preliminary results on modeling the prostate being pushed by neighboring organs with the finite element methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate visualization of stress tensors incurred from some deformations. 

ABOUT Yué Zhang

Yué Zhang received her doctorate from North Carolina State University in the field of applied mathematics.  Her research in modeling nonlinear dynamics led her to join the research and development team at Michelin Tires Corp., where she continued with mathematical modeling on tire manufacturing defects and tire performance. In 2014, she joined the faculty of the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Oregon State University to conduct research in numerical simulation and scientific visualization. She was awarded funding through the National Science Foundation's Research Initiation Initiative in Computer and Information Science Engineering to develop visualization tools on stress tensors. 

Fall 2019 Seminars

Yingge Du

Understanding topotactic phase transitions in epitaxial oxide thin films

Yingge Du
Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Thursday, Sept. 26
4-4:50 p.m.
Johnson 102

 

Abstract

Structurally ordered oxides exhibit a broad range of structural, compositional, and functional properties, which can be further tuned by means of judicious elemental doping, strain and defect engineering. As such, they have found widespread application in energy storage and conversion devices, particularly for use as electrocatalysts, cathodes, and solid state ionics. However, as-designed materials can undergo dramatic changes due to ion diffusion, which, in many cases, leads to performance degradation and device failure.

This talk will highlight our most recent effort aiming to modify complex oxides through heteroepitaxy to achieve tunable functional properties. Combining in situ and environmental transmission electron microscopy (TEM), 18O2 labeled time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and ab initio simulations, we elucidate the structural and chemical evolution pathways in selected materials systems and reveal how such changes impact their functional properties. The first part of my talk focuses on Brownmillerite (BM)-structured SrFeO2.5 (BM-SFO), and rhombohedral-structured SrCrO2.8 (R-SCrO), which are perovskite (ABO3)-associated structures that contain ordered oxygen vacancy channels. We show that at relatively low temperatures, a topotactic phase transition between BM-SFO (R-SCrO) and perovskite SrFeO3 (SrCrO3) can be promoted, delayed, or prohibited based on the interfacial strain conditions, highlighting the importance of interface engineering in designing robust and efficient ion conducting materials. In another example, I will present the epitaxial growth and in situ TEM studies of LiCoO2 with or without overlayers to understand the Li transport processes and device failure mechanisms. In both cases, the high spatial and temporal resolution offered by advanced electron microscopy allows the visualization of reaction onset, kinetics, intermediates, and final products, which is critical for the rational design of functional materials.

 

About Dr. Du

Dr. Yingge Du is a senior staff scientist in the Materials Group of the Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate. Upon receiving his PhD from the University of Virginia, he joined PNNL in 2007 and became a staff member in 2010. He served as technical lead in the acquisition and commissioning of a new state-of-the-art oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system for the EMSL user facility located at PNNL. His current research focuses on growth and characterization of epitaxial metal oxide films and superlattices for energy conversion and storage applications.

Dr. Du is the recipient of a 2016 DOE Early Career Award, which supports him to conduct basic research that aims to understand, predict, and ultimately control cation/anion ordering and topotactic phase transitions occurring in transition metal oxide thin films. Achieving so will enable energy materials (e.g., catalysts, electrodes, and electrolytes) with desired functionalities to be designed, synthesized, stabilized, and harnessed for technological benefits.

 

Hua Zhou 

Identifying Active Surface Entities for Catalytic Conversion by Multimodal Surface X-ray Probes

Hua Zhou 
Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory  
 
Monday, Sept. 30 
4-4:50 p.m. 
Johnson Hall 102 
 

Abstract

Electrocatalysts are materials designed to provide a facilitating environment for electrochemical conversion and synthesis of materials and fuels from atmospheric molecules, which is one of the most important challenges facing societal need of energy in 21st century. One of the major hurdles developing electrocatalysts is the lack of holistic information of the evolving surface structure of materials during electrochemical operation. This is particularly formidable for oxygen evolution reaction (OER), where the oxidizing environment is corrosive and can significantly rearrange the electrocatalyst surface structure. Surface-sensitive X-ray probes from modern synchrotron sources including surface X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray spectroscopy provide a very powerful suite of toolkits to decipher the surface subtlety and evolution. If utilizing these techniques in a well-coordinated approach, one can deliver thorough and deep fundamental insights of surface transformations (e.g. structural, chemical and electronic) during the electrocatalytic process.

In this talk, we will firstly render a brief survey of various surface sensitive X-ray techniques to specifically probe structural and chemical aspects of electrocatalytic materials, in particular the combined approach to differentiate the contribution from surface and bulk layers. Following the survey, we would like to present a few prototypic studies of model systems (e.g. functionalized graphene and metal oxides) for surface catalytic processes. First example is the detailed understanding of the noncovalent functionalization of graphene by small molecule aromatic adsorbates (e.g. phenanthrenequinone), which demonstrates persistent redox activity associated with proton‐coupled‐electron‐transfer reactions. Surface X-ray scattering analysis integrated with ab-initio calculations reveals how the prior introduction of defects and oxygen functionality (hydroxyl and epoxide groups) to the graphene basal plane effectively stabilizes its noncovalent functionalization. The second major demonstration is to present a comprehensive study of the emergent surface transformation of SrIrO3, the most active OER electrocatalyst reported to date, especially the amorphous boundary layer that forms from the pristine crystalline structure on the surface with OER cycling. In virtue of multimodal X-ray probing, a step-by-step transformation mechanism of the amorphization process could be explicitly illuminated. Our X-ray results show that the amorphization is triggered by the lattice oxygen activation and the structural reorganization facilitating coupled cation and anion diffusions is key to the realization of the OER active structure in the final SryIrOx form which exhibits stronger disorder than conventional amorphous IrOx, explaining its champion OER activity. In the end, I will give a short commentary on future opportunities in X-ray studies of multifunctional surfaces and interfaces for energy conversions enabled by the exciting advancements towards ultimate storage rings, in particular with enhanced high-energy and coherence capabilities.

 

About Dr. Zhou 

Dr. Hua Zhou is a staff physicist at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in Argonne National Laboratory. He has managed and developed scientific programs dedicated for in-situ/operando and real-time X-ray studies of advanced materials synthesis, functionality and applications, in particular on surface/interface phenomena and processes in complex environments (e.g. thin film deposition of epitaxial nanostructures and heterostructures, emergent physics of strongly correlated condensed matters, versatile solid/liquid/gas interfaces for electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems) at the APS since 2011. He has extensive research experience using synchrotron-based X-ray techniques to characterize and uncover surface/interface structural modifications and dynamics of epitaxial thin films and heterostructures by using phase retrieval direct methods. Before he joined the APS, he was a postdoctoral fellow in National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and in Chemical Science and Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. degree in Materials Science from University of Vermont in late 2007. His work and contributions on thin films/heterostructures and surface/interface X-ray scattering techniques have been featured in book chapters, reviewers and more than 120 peer-reviewed publications. He has presented about more than 30 invited speeches in international conferences, universities and national labs.

Pei Xu 

Development of Alternative Water Supplies: Innovative Technologies for Water Reuse and Desalination

Pei Xu 
Department of Civil Engineering, New Mexico State University
 
Monday, Oct. 7
4-4:50 p.m. 
Johnson Hall 102 

 

Abstract

Water scarcity and the need to meet the increasing water demands have driven the development of alternative water supplies including seawater, brackish water, agricultural, municipal and industrial wastewaters. Given the energy intensity of existing water infrastructures, it is critical to develop sustainable paradigms for water and wastewater engineering that will balance energy consumption, economic benefits, ecological impacts, and social acceptance. This presentation will highlight a number of innovative technologies for improving process efficiency, reducing carbon footprint, recovering resources from wastewater, generating water with quality tailored for various uses, and an integrated decision support tool for produced water treatment and reuse.

 

About Dr. Xu

Dr. Pei Xu is a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the New Mexico State University. She teaches courses in introduction to environmental engineering, physical/chemical/biological treatment processes, environmental engineering field session, advanced water treatment and reuse, sustainability in food-water-energy-environmental systems, and capstone design projects. Pei's research focuses on water reuse, desalination, and concentrate treatment for inland applications. The goal of her research is to address critical water shortage challenges in arid and semi-arid regions. Her work has been funded by NSF, DOE, BoR, USGS, Water Research Foundation, NASA, and water industry. She currently is a member and co-lead of the Engineering Thrust of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Re-Inventing the Nation's Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt). She was recently selected as the AAAS Leshner Fellow on Food and Water Security, PESCO Endowed Professorship and C. Herb Ward Family Endowed Interdisciplinary Chair at NMSU.

William Prusinski

Biocompatible and Bioactive Surface Coatings for Selective Interactions in Complex Media

William Prusinski
Doctoral Student in Chemical Engineering 

Monday, Oct. 14
4-4:50 p.m.
Johnson 102

 

ABSTRACT

Surfaces that contact blood must often be biocompatible to resist fouling via protein adsorption while simultaneously presenting biological activity. We will describe our work toward a universal nanocoating platform created by attaching biomolecules to a hyperbranched pendent hydrophilic polymer brush. This approach integrates a generic priming layer with in situ surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Enzymes with desirable activity are then immobilized using highly specific click chemistry with non-canonical amino acids, which are incorporated into the peptide sequence at precisely controlled locations through genetic code expansion (GCE) techniques. The brush layer generally retains its protein-repulsive properties after the immobilization. This selectively fouling technology is expected to decrease the cost of bioactive coatings by providing a unified method for coating of various materials, and by eliminating expensive pre-purification steps required by conventional conjugation methods. These coatings may provide a safer and less expensive surface for bioprocessing, biomedical devices, biosensors, and other applications where resistance to protein adsorption must be coupled with biological activity.

 

ABOUT WILLIAM PRUSINSKI

William Prusinski is a third-year doctoral student majoring in chemical engineering at Oregon State University. He works in the Biomaterials and Biointerfaces Laboratory with mentorship from Profesor Kate Schilke, where he researches biocompatible and bioactive surface coatings comprised of enzymes immobilized on hydrophilic polymer layers. He studies the interactions between these coatings and proteins in complex media. The goal of this research concerns improving the antifouling properties of materials for biomedical device applications. Prior to studying at Oregon State, Will earned a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from Valparaiso University in 2016 and then interned in the Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis at the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C.

Alyssa Saito

Chlorinated Ethene Degradation by Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 Grown on Various Substrates: Pure Culture and Co-encapsulated with Slow Release Compounds

Alyssa Saito
Master's Student in Environmental Engineering 

Monday, Oct. 21
4-4:50 p.m.
Johnson 102

 

ABSTRACT

Half of the population of the United States relies on groundwater for domestic uses, and yet many of the aquifers across the nation contain low levels of contamination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A class of VOCs that are common and hazardous contaminants are chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). One method of treatment is through bioremediation by microbes capable of aerobic cometabolism; the induction of oxygenase enzymes in microorganisms growing on a primary substrate that fortuitously degrades contaminants. Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 is a toluene-utilizing bacteria that can cometabolically transform chlorinated ethenes through the activity of the toluene-oxidizing enzyme, toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO). This research investigated both the level of induction of the T4MO in KR1 grown on various growth substrates, as well as the novel development of co-encapsulating KR1 with a slow release compound (SRC) in gellan gum for long-term transformation of contaminants. The level of T4MO expression was evaluated by two methods: 1) Activity based labeling (ABL); a gel assay method used to identify catalytically active monooxygenases (e.g. T4MO), and 2) resting cell kinetic tests in which a known mass of cells grown on a primary substrate are exposed to a contaminant of interest and initial rates of degradation and transformation capacities are determined. Potential SRCs were co-encapsulated with KR1 in gellan gum macro-beads and evaluated through kinetic tests in batch systems over time.

 

ABOUT ALYSSA SAITO

An Oregon native from the Gorge area, Alyssa came to Oregon State University to obtain her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering. Wanting to continue her education, she stayed to pursue her master's in the same field. Her interest in how microbial processes could be utilized for remediation led her to join Lewis Semprini’s research lab, which focuses on the bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater and soil. Alyssa’s research has focused on developing a novel immobilized system for in situ treatment of chlorinated ethenes.

Owen McCarty

The blood microenvironment: The good, the bad, and the sticky

Owen McCarty
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health & Science University

Monday, Oct. 28
4-4:50 p.m.
Johnson 102

 

Abstract

Hemostatic plug formation upon blood vessel breach is initiated by platelet recruitment, activation and aggregation in concert with thrombin generation and fibrin formation. However, a similar process can also lead to pathological processes including deep vein thrombosis, ischemic stroke, or myocardial infarction, among others. We have developed narrow mechanism-specific agents targeting the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and demonstrated that experimental thrombosis and platelet production in primates is interrupted by selective inhibition of activation of coagulation factor (F)XI by FXIIa. In this seminar, I will present new data on the role of the endothelium in inactivating FXI, as well as studies on whether inhibiting FXI is beneficial in a non-human primate model of sepsis. I will present our first data from our clinical trial on the safety of inhibition of FXI, and plans to test the efficacy of FXI inhibition in dialysis. The understanding of the mechanisms by which the intrinsic pathway of coagulation promotes thrombus formation may support the rationale for the development of selective, safe and effective antithrombotic strategies targeting FXI.

 

About Dr. McCarty

A native of Rochester, Dr. McCarty received his bachelor of science in chemical engineering from SUNY Buffalo, and a doctorate in chemical engineering from Johns Hopkins University, where his research focused on the identification and characterization of tumor cell receptors for blood platelets and leukocytes. He performed his postdoctoral research on platelet cell biology in the Pharmacology Department at the University of Oxford and University of Birmingham, UK, in the group of Dr. Steve Watson. McCarty joined Oregon Health & Science University in 2005, where he holds an appointment as a professor in the departments of Biomedical Engineering and Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology and in the Division of Hematology & Medical Oncology in the OHSU School of Medicine. McCarty serves as chair of the Biomedical Engineering Department and a fellow of the American Heart Association.

Richard Oleksak

High temperature corrosion of structural alloys in CO2

Richard Oleksak ('15 Ph.D., Chemical Engineering)
Contracting Research Scientist, National Energy Technology Laboratory

Monday, Nov. 4
4-4:50 p.m.
Johnson 102

 

Abstract

Supercritical CO2 (sCO2) power cycles represent a potentially transformative technology for electricity production in the fossil, nuclear, and concentrated solar industries. A primary barrier to the realization of this technology is identification of structural alloys that can withstand exposure to these harsh environments for the very long operating lifetimes of the plant (> 20 years). This presentation provides an overview of research at NETL aimed at understanding the high temperature oxidation (corrosion) behavior of candidate steels and Ni-based superalloys in the environments expected in future sCO2 power cycles. Both in situ and post-exposure characterization methods have been used to gain insights into alloy corrosion processes at times ranging from the very initial stages of oxidation, to more than one year of exposure. The goal of this work is to achieve a fundamental understanding of degradation mechanisms that can ultimately limit the useful life of a structural alloy component in an sCO2 power cycle.

 

About Dr. Oleksak

Richard Oleksak is a contracting research scientist working with the Structural Materials Team at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Albany, Oregon. He received his doctorate in chemical engineering from Oregon State University in 2015. His current research focuses on understanding the oxidation and corrosion behavior of structural alloys in next-generation power systems.

Adrienne Menniti

The Quest to Unlock the Mysteries of Biological Phosphorus Removal

Adrienne Menniti
Clean Water Services

Thursday, Nov. 7
5-6 p.m. 
Johnson 102

 

Abstract

Clean Water Services is a resource recovery utility serving approximately 600,000 residents of Washington County, Oregon. CWS was one of the first utilities in the country to receive a stringent effluent phosphorus limit and has spent decades learning how to successfully achieve an effluent limit of 0.1 mg/L total phosphorus through a combination of chemical and biological phosphorus removal. Over the last five years, CWS has invested heavily in research to better understand the fundamental mechanisms governing BPR stability. In this presentation, Adrienne Menniti, principal process engineer at Clean Water Services, will provide an overview of CWS as utility, describe how research fits into the CWS mission, and provide an introduction to the BPR research program. Dr. Menniti will also discuss her career path since receiving a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and review job roles and opportunities for environmental professionals with post graduate degrees in the CWS organization.

 

About Dr. Menniti

Adrienne Menniti is principal process engineer at Clean Water Services, where she has worked since 2013. Prior to CWS, Dr. Menniti was a process engineer at C2HM Hill. Specializing in wastewater process design, Menniti earned both her master's and doctorate in environmental engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2008 and a bachelor of science in civil/environmental engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 2001. 

Graham Parker

Everything is Just Chemistry: One ChE’s Career Journey at a DOE National Laboratory

Graham Parker ('73 B.S., Chemical Engineering) 
Emeritus Senior Staff Engineer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Monday, Nov. 18
4-4:50 p.m.
Johnson 102

 

Abstract

This presentation will highlight a nearly 45 year career of Mr. Parker as a Chemical Engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The career path was not always as expected or planed, but was always challenging and satisfying at a laboratory that was dedicated to “Science in the Service of Mankind”. Mr. Parker’s research portfolio includes: water efficiency and wastewater management; atmospheric sciences/air emissions; aerosol physics; nuclear fuel reprocessing; environmental impact statements; indoor air quality; energy end-use metering; building efficiency; coal-to-liquids conversion; energy technology demonstration and deployment; equipment and appliances conservation standards development; and policy development. He will touch upon the education foundation at OSU that enabled him to pursue these research areas and the impacts of his research.

 

About Graham Parker

Graham Parker is emeritus staff at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In nearly 45 years at PNNL, he focused on the design, conduct, and analysis of the evaluations of the performance of buildings and equipment. He has worked with domestic and international clients to develop and promulgate energy policies, improve building energy and water efficiency and deploy new and emerging technologies. Parker is a 1973 chemical engineering graduate of Oregon State University. He is a fellow in the Association of Energy Engineers and a member of the AEE Hall of Fame. He is a certified energy manager and certified energy auditor. He is a member of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Expert Working Group on Energy Efficiency, serves on the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Regional Technical Forum, and is a member of the city of Richland's Utility Advisory Committee. He is the 2017 recipient of the Tom Eckman Lifetime Achievement Award for Energy Efficiency.

Larry Cheng

Nanomaterials-enabled biosensing

Larry Cheng
School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Monday, Nov. 25
4-4:50 p.m. 
Johnson 102

 

Abstract

Physics at the nanometer scale can be vastly different from that of bulk materials.  At the nanoscale, electrokinetics of ionic electrolyte, mass transport phenomenon in solutions, and light-wave interactions may not always behave in the ways we expect. In this talk, I will give an overview of my research on nanofluidics, nanoporous materials, nanoparticles, and nanophotonics, in which we take advantage of their unique physical properties at the nanoscale to improve the performance of biosensing and other applications.

 

About Dr. Cheng

Larry Cheng is an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Oregon State University. His research interests are in the development of functional materials and miniaturized devices for biosensing, wearable sensors, and point-of-care diagnostics. His current research also deals with the electrical and optical properties of nanomaterials with the focus on devices for lighting and THz applications. He received his doctorate in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2008. Before joining Oregon State in 2013, he was a research assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics Initiative at the University of Notre Dame, working on nanobiosensors and microfluidic technologies.